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Tender Comrade

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mrsl
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Tender Comrade

Postby mrsl » April 20th, 2013, 3:03 pm

.
I taped this one last night and watched it this a.m. Although seen before, many points went unnoticed by me as usual. As Cher questioned in her opening discussion with RO, how could this sweet little movie be considered fodder for communism? It was so 100% patriotic for America, it amazes me that anyone could possible find harm in it. I just checked out the imdB info and there is a bit about how the five women living together represented Communism's idea of communal living ! ! ! Also, the word "comrade" in the title did not help, but as shown before even the credits, they were words taken from a poem by, I THINK Robert Louis Stevenson (senior moment about the name). This all makes me think that Wayne LaPierre is a throwback to Sen. J. McCarthy.

The five women all gave exceedingly warm performances, but as much as I love and admire Ginger Rogers, I felt that Ruth Hussey was outstanding as the woman who pretended to be unconcerned about her husband overseas. I love the line when Robert Ryan (as Ginger's fiancee), says, "I've been thinking", and she interrupts with "see, now you're exaggerating". That was one of the few light-hearted lines. Most of the movie is about the war, and sacrifice of both life, and physical objects, like grease, nylon, and meat, etc. Too bad that dialog of Ginger's to her infant son and the ensuing walk down the staircase, which ended the movie was not shown to Bush and his cabinet before they decided to invade Iraq. So much would have been saved. But, in all, at the time the movie was made (1943), and released, at the height of WWII, I doubt if more than a handful of people saw it and walked out dry eyed (including men). Everybody truly wanted to help, and I don't think any of the audiences thought they were seeing anything that was in any way subversive.

Finally, Jane Darwell, at the train station, was perfect. Such a wonderful, warm touch.
.
Anne


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sandykaypax
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Re: Tender Comrade

Postby sandykaypax » April 20th, 2013, 3:36 pm

I recorded this one last night. I've only seen it once before, a few years ago. I do remember loving Ruth Hussey's understated performance. Looking forward to watching it again!

Sandy K

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JackFavell
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Re: Tender Comrade

Postby JackFavell » April 20th, 2013, 5:51 pm

Glad to hear I'm not the only one who really loves Ruth Hussey in this film. I think she's marvelous.

RedRiver
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Re: Tender Comrade

Postby RedRiver » April 21st, 2013, 3:47 pm

I don't know much about the controversy that surrounded this film. My guess is, the word COMRADE was enough to light a few fires! Once I stayed with a friend for a while. He and his girlfriend lived upstairs. I was in the basement. A couple of other people came and went. We shared food, toilet paper, light bulbs, you name it. One night I said, "So, are we communists?"

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JackFavell
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Re: Tender Comrade

Postby JackFavell » April 21st, 2013, 4:28 pm

I think the overall message of the film is to take what good we can from a communist model and apply it to our own lives here, especially in wartime, so we can get through it together, with more for everyone - getting the job done quicker and better as well. It's a great idea, but later it was made to look like the writers were indoctrinating people subtly against their will. Which they actually were, but so what? When differing ideas are blamed for our problems, and banned, it's time to get out of the country.

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sandykaypax
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Re: Tender Comrade

Postby sandykaypax » April 22nd, 2013, 2:47 pm

You know, I get the "communist" angle, but what I took away from the film is that the women all living together and supporting each other was more about SISTERHOOD. At least that's how I choose to see it!

Sandy K

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JackFavell
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Re: Tender Comrade

Postby JackFavell » April 22nd, 2013, 3:36 pm

That's a great way to see it, Sandy! You go, sistah! :D

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sandykaypax
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Re: Tender Comrade

Postby sandykaypax » April 23rd, 2013, 3:00 pm

Well, I watched Tender Comrade last night, and I have to say, I didn't care for Ginger Rogers' performance. She just seemed to be trying a little too hard to show that her character was a bit of a hothead. Less would've been more here. She had many truthful moments--like the scene in the factory where she brings up the idea of house sharing to her co-workers, for example, but so many of her scenes with Robert Ryan seemed forced.

As the movie went on, it seemed to me that Robert Ryan's character treated Ginger's character, Jo, like a small child. The patient and slightly patronizing tone of voice, the way he seemed to indulge her little idiosyncrasies--OMG, she actually wants her husband to spend time talking to her rather then withdrawing and reading at the end of the day! Yes, I understand that he was working overtime to save up money for her, but in an marriage of equality, he would have told her that before she had a tantrum (again, she's a child). I get that it was a different time, blah blah blah, but I still found it incredible that Jo was so capable outside of her marriage, yet infantilized in these scenes.

I love Robert Ryan, but I started to cringe whenever their scenes began. I enjoyed all of the scenes with the women in the house.

I'm glad I watched it again, if only to enjoy seeing the underrated Ruth Hussey and Patricia Collinge.

Sandy K

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JackFavell
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Re: Tender Comrade

Postby JackFavell » April 23rd, 2013, 4:10 pm

I remember feeling that same way, Sandy. Yuck! It made me squeamish. Wonder what women back then thought....

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mrsl
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Re: Tender Comrade

Postby mrsl » April 23rd, 2013, 7:05 pm

JF:

I can tell you what they thought. "My ONLY job is to keep my husband happy. " Woman didn't get backbones until after their years working in the factory. After running the house, caring for the kids, paying all the bills, etc. (not necessarily these women, but in general), suddenly the men came back and expected the 'girls' to return to the insipid little drones they had been before they left. Personally, I think that was the true reason for the women's movement - ERA etc. It took a while to get organized, but finally at the end of the 50's things started happening for women. Before the war, it wasn't unusual for a woman to have to ask her husband for money to buy a dress or shoes - not because of low finances, but because he held the purse strings, paid the bills, and only allotted enough for groceries. Believe me in many homes women not only needed equality at work but in their own homes as well. Ask your mom or grandmom, while much of those traditions continued on through the early 60's.
.


I did enjoy the figuring done on how much they would have to rent a house and hire a maid - $93.00 a month - can you imagine. I know the cost of living is nearly 10 times higher now, but it's still fun to hear such outlandish numbers, isn't it?
.
Anne


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* * * * * * * * What is past is prologue. * * * * * * * *

]***********************************************************************

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JackFavell
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Re: Tender Comrade

Postby JackFavell » April 23rd, 2013, 7:32 pm

I love hearing about how much things cost back then. I always dream of going back in a time machine and buying vintage clothing and housewares for no money. :D

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ChiO
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Re: Tender Comrade

Postby ChiO » April 23rd, 2013, 9:04 pm

I can tell you what they thought. "My ONLY job is to keep my husband happy. "

You obviously did not grow up with the women I grew up with. Too bad.

And if they heard you call them "insipid little drones" they'd thrash you within an inch of your life.
Everyday people...that's what's wrong with the world. -- Morgan Morgan
I love movies. But don't get me wrong. I hate Hollywood. -- Orson Welles
Movies can only go forward in spite of the motion picture industry. -- Orson Welles

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mrsl
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Re: Tender Comrade

Postby mrsl » April 24th, 2013, 3:27 pm

.
Sorry Chio but I grew up in a household of Italian men and women. I don't know how the others in the family were, but it was a three floor house, and the men on each floor ruled the roost. Later when Mom and Dad broke away and got their own place with us kids, Dad was still the ruler. He made the rules and Mom followed them, and hearing "Wait til your Dad gets home", filled us with dread. Dad decided no makeup until age 13 (then only lipstick, no eye stuff), no dating (even in groups) until 16, and when I went out with girlfriends to a dance or something even a couple of blocks away (in safer days), he always drove and picked up. If Mom had been a little more emancipated and if they had a little more faith in their training, we may have had a happier home life. Also, I may have made less mistakes with my own kids and they grew up. I'm not a firm believer in Mom and Dad know best all the time.
.
Anne


***********************************************************************
* * * * * * * * What is past is prologue. * * * * * * * *

]***********************************************************************

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ChiO
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Re: Tender Comrade

Postby ChiO » April 24th, 2013, 3:58 pm

I wasn't denying that some women (maybe most, though I'm not even confident of that) thought, "My ONLY job is to keep my husband happy." My objection is the portrayal of ALL woman at the time as having thought that. And then characterizing all women at the time as returning "to the insipid little drones they had been before"...a bit inaccurate and a lot insulting (if it's not out of place be feel insulted on behalf of my mother, grandmothers, aunts and other women I was around as a child who weren't aware that they were "insipid little drones").
Everyday people...that's what's wrong with the world. -- Morgan Morgan
I love movies. But don't get me wrong. I hate Hollywood. -- Orson Welles
Movies can only go forward in spite of the motion picture industry. -- Orson Welles


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