Gone With or Without fanfare

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Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

Post by SSO Admins »

Designing Women star Dixie Carter is dead at age 70. Cause of death was not disclosed.
klondike

Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

Post by klondike »

I had no idea what her age was!
Obviously, a woman used to beating the odds & averages!
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Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

Post by Lzcutter »

Ground-breaking film editor Dede Allen has died:

Dede Allen, the film editor whose pioneering work on movies like "The Hustler" and "Bonnie and Clyde" brought a new approach to shaping the look and sound of American movies, has died. She was 86.

Allen died Saturday at her home in Los Angeles days after suffering a stroke, her son Tom Fleischman told The Los Angeles Times.

With "Bonnie and Clyde" in 1967, Allen became the first film editor to receive sole credit on a movie. She was nominated for Academy Awards for that movie, 1975's "Dog Day Afternoon," "Reds" in 1981 and "Wonder Boys" in 2000.

Allen was the first American to embrace European methods of editing by beginning sequences with close-ups or jump cuts and using the sound from the next shot while the previous scene was still playing.

Greg S. Faller, professor of film studies at Towson University in Maryland, said "The Hustler" and "Bonnie and Clyde" "must be considered benchmark films in the history of editing."

Many of her techniques are now standard in modern filmmaking.

"It's hard to see the changes she made because most of what she did has been so fully embraced by the industry," Faller said.


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Pioneering film editor Dede Allen dies at 86
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April 18, 2010 04:17 PM EST | AP
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LOS ANGELES — Dede Allen, the film editor whose pioneering work on movies like "The Hustler" and "Bonnie and Clyde" brought a new approach to shaping the look and sound of American movies, has died. She was 86.

Allen died Saturday at her home in Los Angeles days after suffering a stroke, her son Tom Fleischman told The Los Angeles Times.

With "Bonnie and Clyde" in 1967, Allen became the first film editor to receive sole credit on a movie. She was nominated for Academy Awards for that movie, 1975's "Dog Day Afternoon," "Reds" in 1981 and "Wonder Boys" in 2000.

Allen was the first American to embrace European methods of editing by beginning sequences with close-ups or jump cuts and using the sound from the next shot while the previous scene was still playing.

Greg S. Faller, professor of film studies at Towson University in Maryland, said "The Hustler" and "Bonnie and Clyde" "must be considered benchmark films in the history of editing."

Many of her techniques are now standard in modern filmmaking.

"It's hard to see the changes she made because most of what she did has been so fully embraced by the industry," Faller said.
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In "Dog Day Afternoon," she used a staccato tempo, sometimes called shock cutting.

"She creates this menacing quality by not cutting where you'd expect it – she typically would cut sooner than you might expect," Faller said. "You weren't ready for it."

Allen edited or co-edited 20 major films over four decades. She was most closely identified with directors Arthur Penn, Sidney Lumet and George Roy Hill and actor-directors Paul Newman, Warren Beatty and Robert Redford.

Dorothea Corothers Allen was born in Cincinnati on Dec. 3, 1923. She attended Scripps College in Claremont but left school to take a job as a messenger at Columbia Pictures. She started out working on television commercials before getting her first big break in the late 1950s editing Robert Wise's "Odds Against Tomorrow."

In 1994, Allen received a career achievement award given by American Cinema Editors. In November 2007 she received the Motion Picture Editors Guild's Fellowship and Service Award.

In addition to her son, Tom, she is survived by her husband of 63 years, Stephen E. Fleischman, daughter Ramey Ward, five grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.
Lynn in Lake Balboa

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Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

Post by jdb1 »

We have lost another talented figure: prolific voice actor Allen Swift has died at age 87.

Swift was a staple of cartoon voices, and performed, among many others, Mighty Mouse, Simon Bar Sinister (the villain on Underdog) and, for a time was the voice of the puppets on the venerable Howdy Doody Show.

Swift did voiceovers and characters on hundreds of radio and TV commercials. He was very popular in NYC as "the herring maven" (i.e., expert) for Vita Herring products.

But he is best remembered by NYC kids of my era as Captain Allen Swift, the host of the afternoon Popeye cartoon show. You see, children, in my day, cartoon programs were hosted by real, live humans, who reminded us that what we were seeing was all make-believe, and who explained the grownup references in the cartoons we were watching. He was one of the goods ones.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/28/arts/28swift.html?hpw
klondike

Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

Post by klondike »

jdb1 wrote: But he is best remembered by NYC kids of my era as Captain Allen Swift, the host of the afternoon Popeye cartoon show.
I am sure that somewhere on the northernmost elbow of Cape Breton, in a leaning, saltdriven shack overlooking a crumbling jetty, Captain Pierre Bluto drains the last swallow from a contraband bottle of black Tortuga rum, buries his face in his huge, scarred hands, and weeps in bitter silence.
:( :( :(
(No, really, I mean it!)
jdb1

Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

Post by jdb1 »

And another one bites the dust: Blonde supporting player Dorothy Provine (whom I used to confuse with Doris Day) has passed at age 75. She did lots of TV in the 60s, and was in at least one Disney movie -- the kind about dogs and cats with supernatural powers -- and is probably best known as one of the hapless wives dragged along on the treasure hunt in It's a Mad Mad Mad, etc.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/30/arts/ ... e.html?hpw
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Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

Post by mrsl »

.
Dorothy was a staple guest on most of the Warner Bros. westerns in the late 50's and early 60's. I always said she was born about 40 years too late because she played such a great flapper in things like The Great Race, with Tony Curtis and Natalie Wood. She was perfect in The Roaring 20's TV show, and I believe she was also a guest on at least one or two Untouchables. I have no idea what she has been doing lately, I'll have to look her up, but she is one of those that although you like them, when they disappear from your normal viewing format, you pretty much forget about them, until someone or something makes you remember.

Rest in Peace, Ms. Provine
.
Anne


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Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

Post by srowley75 »

Dorothy Provine was one of my favorite 1960s character actresses, and yet another star I'd always hoped I'd meet one day at a convention or similar. The Disney film that you mentioned was the character-actor-laden That Darn Cat, possibly the studio's last great family comedy, playing Hayley Mills' older sister. She has a wonderful scene where she's angrily teasing her hair - she's also very funny in scenes where she's anxiously hoping to hook mother-dominated executive Roddy McDowall. I also liked her opposite Jim Hutton in Who's Minding the Mint?, another all-star comedy in the tradition of Mad, Mad World. And yes, Tarantino fans, she was a favorite of our beloved director QT. Two of her films were shown at his Alamo Grindhouse festivals: the quirky spy comedy Kiss the Girls and Make Them Die (in which she affects a British accent) and The Bonnie Parker Story, one I've recently acquired but have yet to see.

I always thought she and Barbara Harris might've made an interesting onscreen team. They each had such unique comic styles.

-Stephen
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Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

Post by moira finnie »

From the Los Angeles Times:
Image
Early in her career, photographed by Cecil Beaton

Image
In recent years.

Actress Lynn Redgrave, member of British acting dynasty, has died at age 67
Associated Press Writers

8:42 AM PDT, May 3, 2010

NEW YORK (AP) — Lynn Redgrave, an introspective and independent player in her family's acting dynasty who became a 1960s sensation as the freethinking title character of "Georgy Girl" and later dramatized her troubled past in such one-woman stage performances "Shakespeare for My Father" and "Nightingale," has died. She was 67.

Her publicist Rick Miramontez, speaking on behalf of her children, said Redgrave died Sunday night at her Manhattan apartment. In 2003, Redgrave had been treated for breast cancer.

Her death comes a year after her niece Natasha Richardson died from head injuries sustained in a skiing accident and just a month after the death of her older brother, Corin Redgrave.

The youngest child of Michael Redgrave and Rachel Kempson, Lynn Redgrave never quite managed the acclaim — or notoriety — of elder sibling Vanessa Redgrave, but received Oscar nominations for "Georgy Girl" and "Gods and Monsters," and Tony nominations for "Mrs. Warren's Profession," ''Shakespeare for My Father" and "The Constant Wife."
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klondike

Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

Post by klondike »

Moira, thanks for the heads-up, melancholy though it is. :(
I spotted Stuart's thread on LR's passing first, so posted over there.
Do pop in & share if you have time.
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Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

Post by charliechaplinfan »

Beautiful pictures Moira, it's very sad news.
Failure is unimportant. It takes courage to make a fool of yourself - Charlie Chaplin
feaito

Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

Post by feaito »

Sad news indeed, RIP Ms. Redgrave.
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Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

Post by mrsl »

.
Feaito:

Which one was married to Liam Neeson, Lynn or Vanessa?

Such sad news, especially so soon after Natasha.

.
Anne


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* * * * * * * * What is past is prologue. * * * * * * * *

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Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

Post by ken123 »

mrsl wrote:.
Feaito:

Which one was married to Liam Neeson, Lynn or Vanessa?

Such sad news, especially so soon after Natasha.

.
Natasha Richardson was married to Liam.
feaito

Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

Post by feaito »

Yes indeed, Liam Neeson was Vanessa's son-in-law. Vanessa did have a daughter or a son with Franco Nero. Didn't she?
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