Gone With or Without fanfare

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knitwit45
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Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

Post by knitwit45 »

For all those who have served, and given the ultimate gift to all of us, I would like to share the following.

The following is from a Celebration of Life Memorial Ceremony held at the
Veterans Memorial Museum, Chehalis, Washington,
April 26, 2014

There is a day
When your tears of sorrow
softly flow
into tears of remembrance
and your heart begins to
heal itself---
and grieving is interrupted by
flares of joy ---
and you hear the whisper of hope.
There is a day
when you welcome
tears of remembrance
as a sun shower of the soul
a turning of the tide
a promise of peace.
There is a day
when you risk loving ---
go on believing ---
and treasure
the tears of remembrance
"Life is not the way it's supposed to be.. It's the way it is..
The way we cope with it, is what makes the difference." ~ Virginia Satir
""Most people pursue pleasure with such breathless haste that they hurry past it." ~ Soren Kierkegaard
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Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

Post by Sue Sue Applegate »

Very sweet, Knitty. :D
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Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

Post by Lzcutter »

On this day of remembrance comes word that the Bronze Buckaroo, the wonderful Herb Jeffries, has died.

From the Hollywood Reporter:

Herb Jeffries, the first black singing cowboy of the movies, who starred in such 1930s films as Harlem on the Prairie and The Bronze Buckaroo, has died, the Los Angeles Times reported. He was 100.

Jeffries, who later became a recording star as a member of Duke Ellington's orchestra, died of heart failure Sunday at West Hills (Calif.) Hospital & Medical Center, Raymond Strait, who had been working with the actor on his autobiography, told the newspaper.

Jeffries also had the title role in the 1957 film Calypso Joe, playing a singer who helps Angie Dickinson find the right man, and guest-starred on such 1960s TV series as I Dream of Jeannie, The Name of the Game, The Virginian and Hawaii Five-O.

A broad-shouldered man with a thin mustache, Jeffries wore a white Stetson as the good guy in five low-budget Westerns featuring all-black casts: Harlem on the Prairie (1937), Two-Gun Man From Harlem (1938), Rhythm Rodeo (1938), The Bronze Buckaroo (1939) and Harlem Rides the Range (1939).

Jeffries got the idea for an all-black Western after seeing a screening of The Terror of Tiny Town, a Western produced by Jed Buell featuring an entire cast of little people. He convinced Buell to make Harlem on the Prairie, the first sound Western with an all-black cast.
Jeffries wrote his own songs for the film, and the cast included Spencer Williams, who would later portray Andy on the TV show Amos 'n' Andy.

He was born Umberto Valentino in Detroit on Sept. 24, 1913, to an Irish mother and mixed-race father. He learned to ride a horse on his grandfather's dairy farm in Northern Michigan.

The talented entertainer started out as a singer, touring with Earl "Fatha" Hines. After joining Ellington's band, the baritone had such hits as "Flamingo," "In My Solitude" and "I Got It Bad and That Ain't Good." He also appeared with Ellington, Joe Turner and a young Dorothy Dandridge in the bandleader's famed "Jump for Joy" revue that played L.A. in 1941.

After serving in the U.S. Army during World War II, Jeffries recorded the hits "When the Swallows Come Back to Capistrano" and "Basin Street Blues." He moved to France in the early 1950s to open nightclubs.

In 1995, he recorded a well-received album of classic Western songs, The Bronze Buckaroo Rides Again.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/h ... ing-707064
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"Film is history. With every foot of film lost, we lose a link to our culture, to the world around us, to each other and to ourselves."

"For me, John Wayne has only become more impressive over time." Marty Scorsese

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Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

Post by Lzcutter »

Actor Matthew Cowles, better known to All My Children fans as Billy Clyde Tuggle, and actress Christine Baranski's husband for more than the last thirty years has died.

From the Hollywood Reporter:

Matthew Cowles, known for his villainous turn as Billy Clyde Tuggle on the ABC soap opera All My Children, died Thursday. He was 69.
His manager Tsu Tsu Stanton confirmed the news to The Hollywood Reporter.

"He was a very gifted and kind man who loved life and everyone," Stanton stated on Twitter on Friday. The cause of death was not immediately available.

Cowles, whose career in film and television spanned more than four decades, earned two daytime Emmy nominations for his portrayal of Tuggle on the long-running soap opera. He also appeared in the web-only version of the soap when it debuted in 2013.

Survivors include his wife of more than 30 years, The Good Wife actress Christine Baranski, a multiple Emmy nominee and Tony award winner.

Cowles also appeared in a series of small parts in TV series over the years, including bit roles in Kojak (1976), Miami Vice (1985), Law & Order (1991) and a recurring role in HBO's Oz (2003) and BBC One's Life on Mars (2008-09).

He played the trainer for the minor-league Charlestown Chiefs hockey team in Paul Newman's Slap Shot (1977) and had roles on The Juror (1996) and Martin Scorsese's Shutter Island (2010).

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/a ... hew-707038
Lynn in Lake Balboa

"Film is history. With every foot of film lost, we lose a link to our culture, to the world around us, to each other and to ourselves."

"For me, John Wayne has only become more impressive over time." Marty Scorsese

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Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

Post by kingrat »

Thanks for posting these, Lynn. TCM has shown a couple of Herb Jeffries' westerns, and he was very talented.

I was also a fan of Matthew Cowles. Did not know he was married to Christine Baranski.
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Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

Post by Rita Hayworth »

University: Poet, author Maya Angelou dies at 86

Maya Angelou, a modern Renaissance woman who survived the harshest of childhoods to become a force on stage, screen, the printed page and the inaugural dais, has died. She was 86.


By HILLEL ITALIE
Associated Press


Poet Maya Angelou, shown in 2008. Angelou, author of "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings," has died, Wake Forest University said Wednesday. She was 86.


NEW YORK —
Maya Angelou, a modern Renaissance woman who survived the harshest of childhoods to become a force on stage, screen, the printed page and the inaugural dais, has died. She was 86.

Her death was confirmed in a statement issued by Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, where she had served as a professor of American Studies since 1982.

Tall and regal, with a deep, majestic voice, Angelou defied all probability and category, becoming one of the first black women to enjoy mainstream success as an author and thriving in virtually every artistic medium. The young single mother who performed at strip clubs to earn a living later wrote and recited the most popular presidential inaugural poem in history. The childhood victim of rape wrote a million-selling memoir, befriended Malcolm X, Nelson Mandela and the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., and performed on stages around the world.

An actress, singer and dancer in the 1950s and 1960s, she broke through as an author in 1970 with "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings," which became standard (and occasionally censored) reading, and was the first of a multipart autobiography that continued through the decades. In 1993, she was a sensation reading her cautiously hopeful "On the Pulse of the Morning" at former President Bill Clinton's first inauguration. Her confident performance openly delighted Clinton and made the poem a best-seller, if not a critical favorite. For former President George W. Bush, she read another poem, "Amazing Peace," at the 2005 Christmas tree lighting ceremony at the White House.

She remained close enough to the Clintons that in 2008 she supported Hillary Rodham Clinton's candidacy over the ultimately successful run of the country's first black president, Barack Obama. But a few days before Obama's inauguration, she was clearly overjoyed. She told the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette she would be watching it on television "somewhere between crying and praying and being grateful and laughing when I see faces I know."

She was a mentor to Oprah Winfrey, whom she befriended when Winfrey was still a local television reporter, and often appeared on her friend's talk show program. She mastered several languages and published not just poetry, but advice books, cookbooks and children's stories. She wrote music, plays and screenplays, received an Emmy nomination for her acting in "Roots," and never lost her passion for dance, the art she considered closest to poetry.

"The line of the dancer: If you watch (Mikhail) Baryshnikov and you see that line, that's what the poet tries for. The poet tries for the line, the balance," she told The Associated Press in 2008, shortly before her birthday.

Her very name as an adult was a reinvention. Angelou was born Marguerite Johnson in St. Louis and raised in Stamps, Ark., and San Francisco, moving back and forth between her parents and her grandmother. She was smart and fresh to the point of danger, packed off by her family to California after sassing a white store clerk in Arkansas. Other times, she didn't speak at all: At age 7, she was raped by her mother's boyfriend and didn't speak for years. She learned by reading, and listening.

"I loved the poetry that was sung in the black church: 'Go down Moses, way down in Egypt's land,'" she told the AP. "It just seemed to me the most wonderful way of talking. And 'Deep River.' Ooh! Even now it can catch me. And then I started reading, really reading, at about 7 1/2, because a woman in my town took me to the library, a black school library. ... And I read every book, even if I didn't understand it."

At age 9, she was writing poetry. By 17, she was a single mother. In her early 20s, she danced at a strip joint, ran a brothel, was married (to Enistasious Tosh Angelos, her first of three husbands) and then divorced. By her mid-20s, she was performing at the Purple Onion in San Francisco, where she shared billing with another future star, Phyllis Diller. She spent a few days with Billie Holiday, who was kind enough to sing a lullaby to Angelou's son Guy, surly enough to heckle her off the stage and astute enough to tell her: "You're going to be famous. But it won't be for singing."

After renaming herself Maya Angelou for the stage ("Maya" was a childhood nickname), she toured in "Porgy and Bess" and Jean Genet's "The Blacks" and danced with Alvin Ailey. She worked as a coordinator for the Southern Christian Leadership Council, and lived for years in Egypt and Ghana, where she met Malcolm X and remained close to him until his assassination, in 1965. Three years later, she was helping King organize the Poor People's March in Memphis, Tenn., where the civil rights leader was slain on Angelou's 40th birthday.

"Every year, on that day, Coretta and I would send each other flowers," Angelou said of King's widow, Coretta Scott King, who died in 2006.

Angelou was little known outside the theatrical community until "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings," which might not have happened if James Baldwin hadn't persuaded Angelou, still grieving over King's death, to attend a party at Jules Feiffer's house. Feiffer was so taken by Angelou that he mentioned her to Random House editor Bob Loomis, who persuaded her to write a book.

Angelou's musical style was clear in a passage about boxing great Joe Louis's defeat against German fighter Max Schmeling:
"My race groaned. It was our people falling. It was another lynching, yet another Black man hanging on a tree. One more woman ambushed and raped. A Black boy whipped and maimed. It was hounds on the trail of a man running through slimy swamps. ... If Joe lost we were back in slavery and beyond help."

Angelou's memoir was occasionally attacked, for seemingly opposite reasons. In a 1999 essay in Harper's, author Francine Prose criticized "Caged Bird" as "manipulative" melodrama. Meanwhile, Angelou's passages about her rape and teen pregnancy have made it a perennial on the American Library Association's list of works that draw complaints from parents and educators.

"'I thought that it was a mild book. There's no profanity," Angelou told the AP. "It speaks about surviving, and it really doesn't make ogres of many people. I was shocked to find there were people who really wanted it banned, and I still believe people who are against the book have never read the book."

Angelou appeared on several TV programs, notably the groundbreaking 1977 miniseries "Roots." She was nominated for a Tony Award in 1973 for her appearance in the play "Look Away." She directed the film "Down in the Delta," about a drug-wrecked woman who returns to the home of her ancestors in the Mississippi Delta. She won three Grammys for her spoken-word albums and in 2013 received an honorary National Book Award for her contributions to the literary community.

Back in the 1960s, Malcolm X had written to Angelou and praised her for her ability to communicate so directly, with her "feet firmly rooted on the ground. In 2002, Angelou used this gift in an unexpected way when she launched a line of greeting cards with industry giant Hallmark. Angelou admitted she was cool to the idea at first. Then she went to Loomis, her editor at Random House.
"I said, 'I'm thinking about doing something with Hallmark,'" she recalled. "And he said, 'You're the people's poet. You don't want to trivialize yourself.' So I said 'OK' and I hung up. And then I thought about it. And I thought, if I'm the people's poet, then I ought to be in the people's hands -- and I hope in their hearts. So I thought, 'Hmm, I'll do it.'"

In North Carolina, she lived in an 18-room house and taught American Studies at Wake Forest University. She was also a member of the Board of Trustees for Bennett College, a private school for black women in Greensboro, N.C. Angelou hosted a weekly satellite radio show for XM's "Oprah & Friends" channel. She also owned and renovated a townhouse in Harlem, the inside decorated in spectacular primary colors.

Active on the lecture circuit, she gave commencement speeches and addressed academic and corporate events across the country. Angelou received dozens of honorary degrees, and several elementary schools were named for her. As she approached her 80th birthday, she decided to study at the Missouri-based Unity Church, which advocates healing through prayer.

"I was in Miami and my son (Guy Johnson, her only child) was having his 10th operation on his spine. I felt really done in by the work I was doing, people who had expected things of me," said Angelou, who then recalled a Unity church service she attended in Miami.
"The preacher came out -- a young black man, mostly a white church -- and he came out and said, 'I have only one question to ask, and that is, "Why have you decided to limit God?'" And I thought, 'That's exactly what I've been doing.' So then he asked me to speak, and I got up and said, 'Thank you, thank you, thank you, thank you, thank you, thank you.' And I said it about 50 times, until the audience began saying it with me, 'Thank you, THANK YOU!'"
___
Associated Press writer Michael Biesecker in Raleigh, N.C., contributed to this report.
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Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

Post by sandykaypax »

Thanks for posting that article on Maya Angelou, Erik. She has been a favorite of mine since I first read I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings back in my early 20's. 9 years ago, my best friend bought tickets for us to see Maya Angelou as her speaking tour stopped in Cleveland, as a 40th birthday present for me. She was absolutely wonderful--wise, warm and very funny. I cherish the memory of that evening.

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Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

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Just like moons and like suns,
With the certainty of tides,
Just like hopes springing high,
Still I'll rise.


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Barbara Murray has died

Post by stuart.uk »

San to announce the death of UK actress Barbara Murray at age 84

As a young actress Barbara did some noteable films like Passport To Pimlico, playing Stanley Hollaway's daughter and was Dirk Bogarde's love interest in the underated Campbell's Kingdom, which was set in the Canadian countyside in the middle of winter. She was also a cop in skirts (A police woman) in another underrated film Street Corner, where she does a fight scene

In the 60s Barbara did a couple of Saints with Roger Moore, but in the UK she's best known for boardroom serials The Plane Makers and The Power Game oppisite Where Eagles Dare actor Patrick Wymark. In the early 70s Barbara played the female lead in the film Up Pompeii, which was a film version of a popular UK Frankie Howard spoof sit-com which was set during the height of the Roman Empire.

Here's the introduction of The Power Game, which shows Barbara at her height.

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Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

Post by moira finnie »

Karlheinz Böhm, an actor who was also known as Carl or Karl Boehm in his English-language films, has died. Many remember him as the disturbing central character in Michael Powell's Peeping Tom (1962), but a few of us liked this actor quite a lot for his endearing characterization of a young Emperor Franz Joseph in the Sissi (1955) movies out of Austria with a teenage Romy Schneider as his Empress. Böhm had an enviable career, working with everyone from Walt Disney to Rainer Werner Fassbinder and--for the most part--escaping from the historical burden of portraying Nazis more than many of his contemporary German-born actors. The latter director changed his life, as you can see mentioned in The Telegraph's obituary, found here.

Image
Karlheinz Böhm, who has died aged 86, was an Austrian actor celebrated for playing a very English psychopath – the cameraman-killer in Michael Powell’s Peeping Tom; for the last 30 years of his life he dedicated himself to saving lives as the head of an organisation that raises money for humanitarian causes in Ethiopia.

Böhm always considered the latter work to be far more important than his acting. But to cinema audiences he will be remembered for performances in some 45 films, notably alongside a 16-year-old Romy Schneider in the Sissi (1955) trilogy about Empress Elisabeth of Austria. Böhm played Emperor Franz Joseph I and described his relationship with his co-star at the time as “collegial”. The pair, who met again five years later when Romy Schneider was living in Paris, eventually became close friends.

Böhm also liked to recall dancing with Marilyn Monroe, when the pair met at an event in Hollywood thrown by her psychoanalyst. “She wore a huge pair of sunglasses. I said: 'Why don’t you take off your sunglasses?’ She said: 'Am I asking you to get undressed?’ Then we danced. Miss Monroe, glasses on, was beautiful.”

In his most famous acting role, however, Karlheinz Böhm’s attitude to women was considerably more fraught and, controversially, violent. As the nervous, repressed cameraman in Peeping Tom (1960) he plays a killer who mounts a mirror above his lens, then kills women so that they can see their own death pangs, which he records for his pleasure. Powell’s film has been hailed as a creepy masterpiece which perfectly skewers the voyeuristic, complicit character of cinema audiences lapping up sexual and violent themes projected for their pleasure. At the time of its release, however, it was critically derided. Böhm recalled emerging from the premiere with Powell: “We were excited to see the reactions of the audience. We were absolutely puzzled, when they all left the theatre in silence, ignoring us completely.” Unlike Powell, Böhm saw his career recover, thanks to an unlikely combination of Walt Disney and Rainer Werner Fassbinder.

Karlheinz Böhm was born on March 16 1928 in Darmstadt, Germany, the only child of the celebrated conductor Karl Böhm and the soprano Thea Linhard. When he was 11 he went to boarding school in Switzerland. After the end of the war the family moved to Graz.
It was there that, after an argument with his parents one evening, he slashed his wrists with a razor blade. The housemaid found him, and he and his parents never spoke of it again. But his relationship with them continued to prove turbulent. Karlheinz took it upon himself to tell his father of his mother’s indiscretions while the conductor was working at Bayreuth. “Until her deathbed my mother never forgave me,” he said. “Of course that hurt me a great deal.”

Despite this trauma, Karlheinz was keen to follow his parents’ musical careers, only to fail his auditions as a pianist. Instead he studied English, and trained as an actor at the Burgtheater in Vienna. He took odd jobs on film sets and minor roles in theatre and on-screen. But then his big break arrived, with Sissi.

After the shock of Peeping Tom’s mauling, Böhm turned to Hollywood. In 1962 he played Jakob Grimm in MGM’s The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm. Apparently cornering the market in famous-Germans-who-are-not-Nazis, he followed this role with a portrayal of Beethoven in the Walt Disney film The Magnificent Rebel. He could not escape Nazi roles altogether, however, playing a fascist sympathiser in The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse.

He mixed feature and television roles and then, in the mid-1970s, appeared in four films by Rainer Werner Fassbinder. Before they teamed up for first of these, Martha (1974), Böhm visited Fassbinder: “I was impressed by what he was doing, and wanted to work with him. But when I met him he did not even raise his head. Only when I finished speaking did he look at me briefly, muttering something. His arrogance annoyed me deeply.” Fassbinder, however, was evidently more impressed. Days later he sent Böhm the screenplay for Martha.
Böhm credited Fassbinder with “my political awakening”, and on May 16 1981 the actor’s life changed completely. Appearing on a television show, he wagered on a whim that viewers would not stake a few pennies to help people in Sub-Saharan Africa. He was wrong. The money poured in and Böhm flew to Ethiopia with the equivalent of half a million pounds. That November he founded Menschen für Menschen (“People for People”). Two years later he abandoned acting altogether and became a full-time development worker. The charity has since raised hundreds of millions of pounds.

Karlheinz Böhm was four times married, and had seven children. His wife of the last 23 years, Almaz, who is Ethiopian, survives him.
Karlheinz Böhm, born March 16 1928, died May 29 2014
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Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

Post by Lzcutter »

Oscar nominated actress Joan Lorring has died.

From the Hollywood Reporter:

The Oscar-nominated actress Joan Lorring has died more than six decades after appearing opposite Bette Davis in the film The Corn is Green. She was 88.

She died Friday in the New York City suburb of Sleepy Hollow, according to her daughter, Santha Sonenberg.

Lorring was born in Hong Kong and left for the United States with her mother in 1939 to escape the coming Japanese invasion. The two settled in San Francisco, where she started working in radio.

She went on to a career as a stage, screen and television performer. Her earliest American film was the 1944 MGM production "Song of Russia."

Signed with Warner Bros., Lorring was nominated for an Oscar in 1946 for best supporting actress in The Corn is Green, in the role of Bessie Watty.

Lorring also appeared opposite Sidney Greenstreet and Peter Lorre in the 1946 movies Three Strangers and The Verdict.

Broadway roles included Marie in Come Back, Little Sheba, with Shirley Booth, for which she won the Donaldson Award in 1950.

Her many television appearances included The Star Wagon, a 1966 movie with Dustin Hoffman and Orson Bean, and The Love Boat in 1980.

"Right up until her death, she continued to have fans who wrote and sought her autograph and she had a following," Sonenberg said in a statement.

In addition to Sonenberg, she leaves another daughter, Andrea Sonenberg, and grandchildren Josh and Rebecca Jurbala. Lorring's husband, the prominent New York endocrinologist Martin Sonenberg, died in 2011.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/j ... ted-708477
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"Film is history. With every foot of film lost, we lose a link to our culture, to the world around us, to each other and to ourselves."

"For me, John Wayne has only become more impressive over time." Marty Scorsese

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Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

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Ann B. Davis, best known to a generation as Alice, the live-in maid, of the Brady family in The Brady Bunch has died.

From the Hollywood Reporter:

Ann B. Davis, best known as ever chipper live-in housekeeper Alice Nelson on the popular ABC series The Brady Bunch, has died in San Antonio, her longtime agent Robert Malcolm confirmed to The Hollywood Reporter. She was 88.

Davis, who earlier won two Emmy Awards for her role as the peppery secretary Schultzy on The Bob Cummings Show, hit her head during a fall in her bathroom Saturday and was discovered unconscious Sunday morning when she missed her weekly hair appointment. Davis, who was living with close friend and minister William Frey and his wife, died later that day.

"She was very sweet," said Malcolm, who worked with her for 22 years. "I represent a lot of well-known people, and few have been so content with their lot. She enjoyed what she did in life. She just had a birthday [May 3] and was in fine health. It's sad she had to die this way."

The Brady Bunch, created by Sherwood Schwartz, originally aired from September 1969 to March 1974 on ABC, then spent a year in syndication. The cast got together for several reunion films and spinoff series over the years.

It's the story of Mike Brady (Robert Reed), a widowed architect with three sons -- Greg (Barry Williams), Peter (Christopher Knight) and Bobby (Mike Lookinland) -- who marries Carol Ann Martin (Florence Henderson), who has three daughters: Marcia (Maureen McCormick), Jan (Eve Plumb) and Cindy (Susan Olsen). (Carol's marital past was never addressed on the show.)

For more: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/a ... nch-708536
Lynn in Lake Balboa

"Film is history. With every foot of film lost, we lose a link to our culture, to the world around us, to each other and to ourselves."

"For me, John Wayne has only become more impressive over time." Marty Scorsese

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Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

Post by Rita Hayworth »

Ann B. Davis ... is my favorite Character on the Brady Bunch Television Show. I also remember her (in syndication) The Bob Cummings Show and she was great as Charmaine Schultz and also appeared on the The John Forsythe Show as well.

She always be Alice Nelson on the Brady Bunch and it's numerous incarnations ...

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Ann B. Davis as Alice in the Brady Bunch Show.
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Re: Gone With or Without fanfare

Post by RedRiver »

I'm not crying. It's those darned onions!
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Re: Barbara Murray has died

Post by moira finnie »

stuart.uk wrote:San to announce the death of UK actress Barbara Murray at age 84

As a young actress Barbara did some noteable films like Passport To Pimlico, playing Stanley Hollaway's daughter and was Dirk Bogarde's love interest in the underated Campbell's Kingdom, which was set in the Canadian countyside in the middle of winter. She was also a cop in skirts (A police woman) in another underrated film Street Corner, where she does a fight scene

In the 60s Barbara did a couple of Saints with Roger Moore, but in the UK she's best known for boardroom serials The Plane Makers and The Power Game oppisite Where Eagles Dare actor Patrick Wymark. In the early 70s Barbara played the female lead in the film Up Pompeii, which was a film version of a popular UK Frankie Howard spoof sit-com which was set during the height of the Roman Empire.
Image
A nice appreciation for Barbara Murray from The Telegraph can be seen below. I remember her particularly from The Pallisers. Her turns in the delightful Passport to Pimlico (1949) and her appearances in the Doctor in the House series are happy memories for classic film buffs. This actress can be seen in the a couple of the upcoming these movies being featured on TCM on Saturdays, beginning this month. Doctor at Large (1957) is scheduled for 6/7 @10:30am (ET) and Doctor in Distress (1963) will be on at the same time on 6/14. Murray can also be seen in the English-made Bette Davis-Gary Merrill mystery, Another Man's Poison (1951) on 6/24 @9:45pm (ET).
Barbara Murray, who has died aged 84, was a Rank starlet of the post-war era who starred in the charmingly whimsical Ealing comedy Passport to Pimlico (1949).
She later became known to television viewers for her roles such as Lady Pamela Wilder in the ITV drama series The Power Game (1965-69); the widowed millionairess Madame Max Goesler in The Pallisers (BBC, 1974); and the theatrical matriarch Lydia Brett in The Bretts (ITV, 1987-89).

Barbara Ann Murray was born in London on September 27 1929. Her parents, Freddie and Petronella, were music hall “hoofers”, and she accompanied them on tour (making an early stage appearance with Gracie Fields in Norwich) until her sixth birthday, when she was sent to a boarding school in London. By the age of 16 she was dancing professionally with her parents.
After attending drama school in London and working as an artist’s model, Barbara Murray was signed to a contract by the J Arthur Rank Organisation and sent to its “Charm School”, alongside Honor Blackman, Diana Dors and Lana Morris.

She had a busy career in the late 1940s and 1950s as a fresh-faced leading lady in many films. After making her screen debut in a small part in Anna Karenina (1947), she was Stanley Holloway’s daughter in Passport to Pimlico (1949), while in Meet Mr Lucifer (1953) she played the wife of a man who is given a (then rare) television set as a retirement present and finds himself the recipient of the unwelcome attentions of his neighbours.
She starred opposite Dirk Bogarde in Doctor at Large (1957) and Doctor in Distress (1963), and Tony Hancock in The Punch and Judy Man (1963), in which she gave an aloof performance as Lady Jane Caterham, the grande dame brought in to switch on the Christmas lights of a seaside town. Her last screen appearance was in The Curse of King Tut’s Tomb (1980).

Barbara Murray and James Robertson Justice in Doctor in Distress
Barbara Murray’s stage career began in regional rep at the Newcastle Playhouse, and she continued to appear in provincial repertory into old age, most recently as Miss Marple in a touring production of Murder at the Vicarage. In 1952 she appeared in the first production at the newly reopened Royal Court, The Bride of Denmark Hill, and she made her West End debut in Jack Roffey’s No Other Verdict two years later. She appeared opposite Ian Carmichael as Isolde Poole in The Tunnel of Love (1957) and was Stella in the RSC’s premiere of Harold Pinter’s The Collection (1962), alongside Michael Hordern and Kenneth Haigh. In the same year she made her sole Broadway appearance, as Madeline Hanes in the Leslie Wilder comedy In the Counting House, which closed after six performances.
Her stage career continued as she was becoming known as a television actress. In 1967 she took over (from Honor Blackman) the role of the blind heroine terrorised by a group of murderous crooks in Frederick Knott’s smash-hit thriller Wait Until Dark, and she played Mrs Allonby in A Woman of No Importance at the Chichester festival in 1978.

As Pamela Wilder in the 1960s television drama series The Plane Makers (and the sequel, The Power Game) she watched her fictional husband John Wilder (Patrick Wymark) conduct affairs with younger women, but refused to do “bedroom scenes” with the lovers lined up for her when he deserted her. As Lydia Brett in The Bretts, she and her husband Charles (Norman Rodway) struggled to manage a household consisting of five children, a butler, cook, chauffeur and secretary, while trying to prove they could still tread the boards with style.
Her other television credits included His and Hers; The Rivals of Sherlock Holmes; Danger Man; The Saint; The Mackinnons; Doctor Who; and the sitcom Albert and Victoria.

In later life Barbara Murray moved to Alicante. She was married, first, to the actor John Justin; and secondly to the actor Bill Holmes. Both marriages were dissolved, and she is survived by the three daughters of her first marriage.
Barbara Murray, born September 27 1929, died May 21 2014
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