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Mickey Rooney

Posted: April 30th, 2007, 11:04 pm
by Hollis
I know that Mickey Rooney has been around for what seems like forever. I'm guessing that he first arose to real popularity with the "Andy Hardy" series of movies. I've just watched "The Black Stallion" and came away more than a little impressed with his performance in the film. I'm curious about the general perception of him throughout his career by the film community and his peers. Was he ever recognized for his talents other than those shown during his adolescent years? Was he ever nominated for an Academy Award for any of his roles? Thanks all.

Hollis

The Big Mick

Posted: May 1st, 2007, 1:55 am
by Lzcutter
Hollis,

Mickey Rooney's career actually started long before the Andy Hardy series.
He made his debut as a child (credited as Mickey McGuire) in 1926 in Not To Be Trusted.

His big break came in 1934 in Manhattan Melodrama where he played Blackie Gallagher as a youngster. The adult Blackie was played by Clark Gable. Manhattan Melodrama had the added distinction of being the film that John Dillinger was coming out of the night he was shot by the Feds.

He had roles in Little Lord Fauntleroy, Captains Courageous and Thoroughbreds Don't Cry before landing the role of Andy Hardy. Also during that time he was doing a series of musicals with Judy Garland which helped propel to him to the top of the box office stars.

He won a Juvenile Award from the Academy in 1939 for his work as a juvenile actor.

He was nominated in 1940 for Babes in Arms, 1944 for The Human Comedy, 1957 for the Bold and the Brave and 1980 for The Black Stallion. The Black Stallion brought with it a revival of the Mick in Hollywood and among his fans.

Like many men before him and since, he found his personal life overshadowing his professional life as he jumped from marriage to marriage looking for happiness. Ex- Mrs. Rooneys include: Ava Gardner and other actresses. He had numerous affairs. Many Judy Garland fans like to imagine how different their lives would have been had they married and managed to stay together. Has been married to his current wife longer than any previous wife.

He appeared opposite Ann Miller in Sugar Babies on Broadway in the 1970s which revitalized both their careers.

He last appeared on screen last year in "Night at the Museum".

Quite a career. Quite an actor.

Posted: May 1st, 2007, 9:12 am
by mongoII
At 86 years old the Brooklyn born Mickey Rooney is a show business legend. The versatile actor has earned his place in the sun.
Through ocassional ups and downs he has always managed to revive his career and bounce right back.
No doubt that the little guy is here to stay. Bless you, Mickey.

Posted: May 1st, 2007, 9:42 am
by Hollis
Dear Lynn and Mongo,

Thanks for all the info. I knew I could count on you. I do remember some of those musicals with Judy Garland but I didn't know where they fit in a time line relative to his Andy Hardy roles. Thanks again.

Hollis

Posted: May 1st, 2007, 11:37 am
by Ayres
I think Mickey Rooney is amazingly talented. The guy could sing, dance, play the drums, and do hilarious impressions (my personal favorite: Carmen Miranda--I laugh so hard at "Mama Yo Quiero" from Babes on Broadway, every single time!).

I've never read his autobios and don't know all that much about his personal life, though one studio dancer friend of mine who palled around with him in the late '30s confirmed that he was a bit of a sex maniac.

Posted: May 1st, 2007, 12:06 pm
by mongoII
There is no doubt that the little guy was tall in the saddle.

Posted: May 7th, 2007, 3:03 pm
by knitwit45
I posted this at the "other" forum, but here goes again...
I got to see Ann Miller and Mickey Rooney in "Sugar Babies" when the show came to Kansas City, MO. The two of them were irresistable. The material was ok, but get them on stage at the same time...Magic.

At one point, Ann was supposed to be "the woman in black" testifying at either her murder trial or divorce proceedings (sorry, but it WAS a long time ago). Anyway, her dress was slit up the side and her legs got a standing ovation!

She proceeded to knock "Judge" Mickey's wig off, and gasped, "Oh, Mickey, your HAIR!!!". He made it seem part of the show (perhaps it was). Anyway, they did a dance number that left us gasping and laughing and applauding for what seemed like 20 minutes.

What a memory!

Mickey causes an international incident! Pretty good for 86!

Posted: May 8th, 2007, 8:00 am
by moira finnie
He may be 86, and entitled to get away with such things, but Mickey--for some reason--was a part of the festivities in Washington yesterday when Queen Elizabeth II rolled into town. He couldn't restrain himself, (big shock), and tossing all protocol aside, laid a kiss on the Queen's gloved hand. Oh well, what are they gonna do to him? Here's a link to a picture of the event:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/in_pictures/6633867.stm

Mick and the Queen

Posted: May 8th, 2007, 8:33 am
by knitwit45
Actually, she looks rather charmed, doesn't she? Being "untouchable" must be very lonely. But you get to wear hats and tiaras, always have the best seat in the house, and even tear a pheasant now and then...

Nancy

Posted: May 8th, 2007, 2:54 pm
by mongoII
Moira, I saw the clip of Mickey kissing the queen's hand, and I loved every second of it. The little guy from Brooklyn plays no favorites when it comes to women.
Auctually she should have kissed his hand. At 86 he was once the king of Hollywood.

Posted: May 8th, 2007, 3:07 pm
by ken123
Mickey Rooney is someone that I can take a in small doses. :wink:

Posted: May 8th, 2007, 3:43 pm
by Dewey1960
The versatile Mr. Rooney even managed to appear in a couple of top-notch films noir in the 1950s: THE STRIP (51) an MGM curio which had him playing a jazz drummer mixing it up with crooks on LA's Sunset Strip and DRIVE A CROOKED ROAD (54) matched him with Kevin McCarthy and Jack Kelly in a tense little potboiler released through Columbia. Both well above average.

Posted: May 8th, 2007, 3:50 pm
by ken123
Dewey1960 wrote:The versatile Mr. Rooney even managed to appear in a couple of top-notch films noir in the 1950s: THE STRIP (51) an MGM curio which had him playing a jazz drummer mixing it up with crooks on LA's Sunset Strip and DRIVE A CROOKED ROAD (54) matched him with Kevin McCarthy and Jack Kelly in a tense little potboiler released through Columbia. Both well above average.


With a cast with the names Kelly, Mccarthy, and Rooney in it ithe film HAS to be very good. :lol: