Now and then

Discussion of programming on TCM.

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moira finnie
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Now and then

Post by moira finnie »

I've been wondering about a phenomenon that's happened to me in the last few years and wondered if it's an inevitable part of maturing, (or, as it's known around chez Finnie, "getting crusty", or "ripening" ). :wink:

Have you seen movies as a child or an adolescent that you thought were splendid, and, when you revisited them as an adult, found that they were less than wonderful?

Have you seen movies as a child or an adolescent that you thought were lousy, and, when you revisited them as an adult, found that they were much better than you remembered?

Are there any movies that are equally as enjoyable now as when you were a youngster?

Of course, we couldn't possibly have changed, could we? The movies must've changed, huh? Thanks in advance for any insights you choose to share.
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Moraldo Rubini
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Let's Go Fly a Kite

Post by Moraldo Rubini »

I'll pull this over from the old board; my note on Mary Poppins:

"When I saw Mary Poppins as an adult I appreciated the brilliant dichotomy of the movie. It's two movies in one: to children viewing the film, Mary Poppins arrives for the children; for adults, we see that she came for the father. Once she has taught him the value of having an active part in his own children's upbringing, her job is done. The same movie works on two levels for these two age groups. Neither view was intended to be a "cheery confection". It is a sometimes dark and scary movie.

As someone who lives in a city with a terrible homeless problem, I like that the pigeon-feeding bag lady is seen through the eyes of Michael Banks as someone of humanity and worth. I'm glad that a son's love is more important than a tuppence."
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mrsl
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My Innocence

Post by mrsl »

Moira:

I've got dozens, but I'll only work on my favorite movie, Casablanca. When I first saw it I was about 15. To me it was just a love story with stupid time fillers to make a full movie. The idea of what and who Lazlo was, was completely lost on me, as was the reason the young wife asked Rick about a girl who does something that her husband would not like. I was the epitome' of innocence, believe me. Later when I started to understand more, I kept watching it over and over again to see more. That movie, more than any other I've seen, including greats like Liberty Valence, and so many others, is more chock full of so many different stories going on in one movie, it is just amazing. Every character, even some of the lesser ones has a story to tell. The overall intrigue of the war, the letters, the love stories, and the little blond girl and Peter Lorre all add so much that it requires more than one viewing to get the full impact and understanding of it.

Anne
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Moraldo Rubini
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More Nazis

Post by Moraldo Rubini »

Brava Anne!

And as long as we're dealing with Nazis, I have another: Cabaret. I saw this when it first came out. I was in high school and this Berliner tale seemed romantic and glamorous. Liza Minelli's character Sally Bowles seemed so worldly and sophisticated.

Two decades later I saw the film and was shocked: Sally Bowles was a very young adult who desperately longed to seem worldly and sophisticated, but was lost in a world that was falling apart around her. She was a rube from middle America, out of her element and making the best of it. I think I was even more impressed with this film upon seeing it later, but in such a different way.
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Re: Let's Go Fly a Kite

Post by SSO Admins »

Moraldo Rubini wrote:"When I saw Mary Poppins as an adult I appreciated the brilliant dichotomy of the movie. It's two movies in one: to children viewing the film, Mary Poppins arrives for the children; for adults, we see that she came for the father.
Good assessment. There's a "Christian" web site that rates movies based on their suitability for children, rating them on "offensive" content with no attempt to judge the suitability of the message. In their FAQ, one of the moves they rate as scoring 100% on suitability is Mary Poppins.

One day in a particularly obnoxious mood I wrote them a letter taking them to task for giving a high rating to a movie where a witch invades a household and subverts parental authority. I asked them if they were ok with portraying the child's parents as ineffective, and teaching that magic and probable Satanism were ok.

I never got a response.
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Moraldo Rubini
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Bubble bubble toil and trouble...

Post by Moraldo Rubini »

The sassy Jon wrote:
One day in a particularly obnoxious mood I wrote them a letter taking them to task for giving a high rating to a movie where a witch invades a household and subverts parental authority. I asked them if they were ok with portraying the child's parents as ineffective, and teaching that magic and probable Satanism were ok.
That's hysterical. Satanism? Poppins and Burt did use the fireplace as their hub, didn't they?!

:wink:
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Kyle In Hollywood
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Post by Kyle In Hollywood »

When I was little, I would make time for every showing of The World, The Flesh and The Devil (The Harry Belafonte/Inger Stevens film) whenever it would show up on television. I don't know why I was so interested or entertained. Perhaps it was the idea of having an entire city to one's self in which to play and create a fantasy world of one's own making. And maybe the inter-racial storyline was exotic to a youngster in lily white Wisconsin.

As an adult, I saw it on TCM in the past few years and was pretty bored. By the time it degenerated into the "hunt for the race-defiler", I was laughing.

The Flesh... had gone the way of all flesh - and turned to carrion.

kjk
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klondike

Post by klondike »

Under "films I loved then that are painful to look at now":

"FM"

Man alive, back in '76 I thought this movie was cool, hip, topical, sexy, droll and loaded with delicious li'l bits of jagged black humor and political satire.
It also introduced the uniquely cool & goofy Martin Mull, and the exotic, voluptuous Brenda Venus, and featured such then-reliable box office names as Michael Brandon, Eileen Brennan, Alex Karras, Cleavon Little, James Keach & Linda Ronstadt.
Its jazzy, sassy Steely Dan theme went Top 10, and the movie's plotline went on to inspire the small screen's WKRP in Cincinnati.
And now . .
Well, the Steely Dan tune "FM" is still just as punchy & fun & cool as ever, but, uhh, as for the rest . . .
Errrrrrgh!
Clumsy, tired, adolescent, stilted dialogue, bad set design, choppy segues . . what was I lookin at back then ? :oops:

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Post by Mr. Arkadin »

klondike wrote:Under "films I loved then that are painful to look at now":

"FM"

Man alive, back in '76 I thought this movie was cool, hip, topical, sexy, droll and loaded with delicious li'l bits of jagged black humor and political satire.
It also introduced the uniquely cool & goofy Martin Mull, and the exotic, voluptuous Brenda Venus, and featured such then-reliable box office names as Michael Brandon, Eileen Brennan, Alex Karras, Cleavon Little, James Keach & Linda Ronstadt.
Its jazzy, sassy Steely Dan theme went Top 10, and the movie's plotline went on to inspire the small screen's WKRP in Cincinnati.
And now . .
Well, the Steely Dan tune "FM" is still just as punchy & fun & cool as ever, but, uhh, as for the rest . . .
Errrrrrgh!
Clumsy, tired, adolescent, stilted dialogue, bad set design, choppy segues . . what was I lookin at back then ? :oops:

Klondike
Totally agree. I also think WKRP was also much funnier. I remember the first time I saw La Dolce Vita (1960) I didn't understand the film, but I knew I was watching something special. I remember thinking to myself "I don't get this at all, but it's cool." 8)
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Post by CharlieT »

Moraldo Rubini wrote:

"That's hysterical. Satanism? Poppins and Burt did use the fireplace as their hub, didn't they?!"

No, that would be SANTAism. :lol:
"I'm at my most serious when I'm joking." - Dudley

Don't sweat the petty things - don't pet the sweaty things.
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ken123
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Post by ken123 »

S A N TA scrambled equals S A T A N. :lol:
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Post by knitwit45 »

I was about 12 the first time I saw "Meet Me In St. Louis", on the '10:30 pm and 1:00 pm following day Movie of the Weekend'...and fell in love with Tom Drake, Judy Garlard, and young romance.

As an adult, I still am totally charmed by the movie, but now I see it thru Mary Astor's eyes, holding her family together, dealing with a sometimes "difficult" husband and youngest child. Even the smallest, most minor parts are played to perfection (IMHO).

Jack and Joe, I still haven't heard back from Margaret O'Brien, re the girl on the trolley. We can only hope!

Nancy
"Life is not the way it's supposed to be.. It's the way it is..
The way we cope with it, is what makes the difference." ~ Virginia Satir
""Most people pursue pleasure with such breathless haste that they hurry past it." ~ Soren Kierkegaard
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Old Acquaintances

Post by Moraldo Rubini »

knitwit said:
Jack and Joe, I still haven't heard back from Margaret O'Brien, re the girl on the trolley. We can only hope!
Nancy! It's you! I saw the handle "knitwit", but couldn't place it. But of course, you're the pal whose quest is to discover who the camera-loving extra was in Meet Me in St. Louis. So glad to see you here.

Fellini's La Dolce Vita is a movie that becomes richer and richer with each viewing. I think I was mainly bored the first time; the second time I was only interested in the Mastroianni/Ekberg storyline. I remember thinking it was too long. Now, years later, I'm enraptured by it.
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Post by knitwit45 »

Hi Jack! Yup, c'est moi! And by the way, just to show what a newbie I was before reading your posts, thanks for getting me started on watching the "extras" and directors commentaries on my DVD's. I had tried once, but was annoyed by not hearing the movie dialog....duh!!!!!! Now I first view the movie (if I haven't already seen it) and then go back for the director's comments.

I find that most of the musicals of the 50's, that I ADORED as a child, are pretty boring now, except for "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers" and "Singin' in the Rain".
"Life is not the way it's supposed to be.. It's the way it is..
The way we cope with it, is what makes the difference." ~ Virginia Satir
""Most people pursue pleasure with such breathless haste that they hurry past it." ~ Soren Kierkegaard
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Post by sandykaypax »

Jack, love your assessment of Mary Poppins. So true.

I first saw Citizen Kane when I was about 21 or so...I had heard it was the greatest film EVER. It held my interest, but I couldn't see what all the fuss was about. My then-boyfriend had to explain the significance of Rosebud. That sparked something in me and I read anything I could about the film. On subsequent viewings, I found so many things I hadn't noticed before. I love Citizen Kane.

Is is the greatest film EVER? I don't know, but I think it's pretty darn good. I admit, though, that I like The Magnificent Ambersons even better.

Sandy K
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