The April 2013 TCM Schedule

Discussion of programming on TCM.

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moira finnie
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Re: The April 2013 TCM Schedule

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kingrat wrote:Thank you, Moira and Rohanaka, for your wonderful discussions of Three Came Home. Moira was one of the posters who recommended this fine film, and TCM has shown it with some regularity. I've also enjoyed the comments about So Proudly We Hail, which is superb propaganda as well as a good film. By the way, Moira, I noted how Claudette got all the light in that foxhole shot, too. "And also featuring George Reeves as the Shadow . . . ."

Both leading ladies are definitely older than their boytoys, Claudette 11 years older than George Reeves according to Wiki. Paulette apparently took as much as 10 years off her age, but she's older than "the big yap" Sonny Tufts, who is right for the part even if he is not an especially good actor. I believe that what Cher didn't immediately respond to in Colbert was the ladylike quality she brings to most of her roles, which was something admired and valued by an older generation.
I love that description of Reeves as "The Shadow." Even "Kansas" the likable goof, was in shadow most of the time when Paulette was batting her eyelashes at him. I had a creepy feeling that if both of them lived through this, he would spend a lifetime agreeing with her. Maybe that is what both needed?

I agree about Claudette's "ladylike" manner keeping her separate from later viewers--though I would suggest that people look back at The Gilded Lily, Torch Singer, and The Smiling Lieutenant to see her frisky side. She always had enormous strength, as well as a gift for romantic comedy that seems to be a lost to subsequent generations, alas.
kingrat wrote:Paulette Goddard's sexiness, even when she's playing a minx, is like the natural overflow of energy and vitality. She's one of my favorites, though I haven't seen many of her films. By the mid-50s she was only in obscure movies. What happened to her career?
According to Burgess Meredith's autobiography (to whom she was more or less married during the '40s) and one I read about Erich Maria Remarque (her hubby from 1958 until his death in 1970) Paulette was always a realist, who carefully kept the best jewelry given her by her many admirers, carried it with her, and was very savvy about business and investment. Having been born extremely poor (Paulette and her mother were migrant workers at one point in their lives), who can blame her for being careful about money? One later performance by Goddard that I like: An Ideal Husband (1947) in which she plays Oscar Wilde's mercenary character, Laura Cheveley beautifully. Her very best role is probably in Mitchell Leisen's Kitty (1945), which pairs her again with Ray Milland. BTW, she left much of her loot to NYU and set up an Erich Maria Remarque-Paulette Goddard Foundation as well, which you can see here.
kingrat wrote:I had no idea Veronica Lake had the dramatic force she shows in SPWH. She's good in Sullivan's Travels and The Glass Key, but here she is powerful in sort of a Jessica Lange role.
Good call! I'd never thought of Veronica and Jessica as similar before, but they sure have a kinship now that you point it out.
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Re: The April 2013 TCM Schedule

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I'm enjoying the discussion of Three Came Home as well.

Ro, I so love reading what you have to say! I can imagine the fear instilled in these prisoners, wondering if they had to watch what they said even after coming back home, for fear of "insulting" someone even if it was with the truth. I totally see denial in Suga's actions. His embarrassment was also a strong and powerful incentive toback off, never to let anything touch him again... just so he could get through the war with his sanity in tact. If you consider yourself a civilized person, such things would have to be compartmentalized or blocked out. And there is nothing worse you can do to someone than embarrass them. It is an emotion that no one wants, and can turn even a friend into an enemy at a moment's notice, even if you didn't mean to do it. Sometimes the witnessing of it is all it takes to set someone at you.

kingrat, I had suggested that Ro watch Three Came Home in an earlier conversation at TCM City about So Proudly We Hail. Sorry if I inadvertently took credit for Moira's separate and very good suggestion.

Somehow, I always think that Veronica Lake was at her most real in SPWH, I know she had some troubles in real life, and somehow, I think she really latched onto something deep inside with her portrayal of Lt. Olivia D'Arcy. Just my opinion, of course, but she's so very good here, never letting any 'niceness' show. Its a wonderful performance. I find her extremely compelling.

Did anyone else watch Pierre Etaix? Gosh, I'm so glad I recorded him. It was a big treat. I instantly fell in love with him. The film Yo Yo was like a cross of Chaplin, Tati and Fellini. I was surprised because I had been thinking of Fellini all through the picture, then got a confirmation with a little in joke partway through... The circus comes to a city and discovers (by way of poster) that Gelsomina and Zampano have arrived before them. So they pack up and leave.
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Re: The April 2013 TCM Schedule

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JackFavell wrote: Somehow, I always think that Veronica Lake was at her most real in SPWH, I know she had some troubles in real life, and somehow, I think she really latched onto something deep inside with her portrayal of Lt. Olivia D'Arcy. Just my opinion, of course, but she's so very good here, never letting any 'niceness' show. Its a wonderful performance. I find her extremely compelling.
So, true Jack ... I consider that this is one of her better roles in her career. I was stunned how well she did and like you said it is "extremely compelling" ... Spoken so true here!
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Re: The April 2013 TCM Schedule

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JF, I actually meant that Moira was one of the people who had recommended Three Came Home to me a couple of years ago. We're all on the same page about this fine film. Now I'm glad I recorded Yo Yo. You make me eager to see it.

A note about Mark Sandrich, director of So Proudly We Hail: if you recognize the name, you probably think of Astaire/Rogers musicals. He directed five of them and also Holiday Inn. According to imdb, he died suddenly of a heart attack at the age of 44. He did a fine job with So Proudly We Hail.

If you're glancing at the schedule for tomorrow morning (Thursday), you may not realize that it's actually a tribute to Flora Robson, with some obscure English films. We can only thank TCM for broadening our horizons with those.

2,000 Women (1944), dir. Frank Launder. The Nazis turn a posh hotel into a POW camp for Englishwomen stranded in France.
Great Day (1945), dir. Lance Comfort. Small-town women face personal problems while preparing for a visit from Eleanor Roosevelt. Also starring Eric Portman.
Fire Over England (1937), dir. William K. Howard. This one is better known, with Flora as Queen Elizabeth I, and Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh also in the cast. Set in the time of the Spanish Armada.
High Tide at Noon (1957), dir. Philip Leacock. A fisherman and his boss's daughter face marital problems because of class differences. I believe this one has location shooting on a remote island.
Innocent Sinners (1957), dir. Philip Leacock. A young girl in a bombed-out part of London decides to plant a garden in a ruined church. Highly recommended by several imdb reviewers. NOTE: the TCM schedule lists this 96-minute film in a 90-minute time slot. Record accordingly.
Murder at the Gallop (1963), dir. George Pollock. Margaret Rutherford as Miss Marple in a free adaptation of Agatha Christie's Funerals Are Fatal. Flora Robson and Robert Morley play two of the suspects.
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Re: The April 2013 TCM Schedule

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Murder at the Gallop ... I wanted to see that movie for eons ... thanks for pointing it out Kingrat!
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Re: The April 2013 TCM Schedule

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[u]kingrat[/u] wrote:If you're glancing at the schedule for tomorrow morning (Thursday)...

Great Day (1945), dir. Lance Comfort. Small-town women face personal problems while preparing for a visit from Eleanor Roosevelt. Also starring Eric Portman.
And also featuring Philip Friend.

Shortly after appearing in "Great Day", Friend was brought across the pond by Selznick, on no less a recommendation than Hitchcock's. Yet Selznick never placed him in a film, and Friend ultimately made little impact with Stateside moviegoers.

But there was a fine actor with a gift for backstory. If Hollywood never used it well, Friend--quietly and without self-importance--did. Do give him a look.
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Re: The April 2013 TCM Schedule

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kingrat, sorry about the mixup with Moira's recommendation of Three Came Home. We had talked about this a couple of weeks ago on the other website, so I thought I had grabbed a share of credit that wasn't mine.

Thanks very much for the Flora Robson reminder... I am hoping that one of these movies is the one I've been looking for for years. There is a particular scene that has always stuck with me about women in wartime England and I still haven't found the film.
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Re: The April 2013 TCM Schedule

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Thanks Jackie.. (and ps, I had completely forgotten about you mentioning TCH to me.. duh. Coulda watched it even sooner than I did had I not lost track of myself. silly me. I am just glad to have caught it WHENEVER I did. ha. It really is a good story) And I totally get what you are saying about the power (for destruction) that embarrassment has. It really is one of the stronger emotions (for motivating someone in a negative way) It CAN also be a good thing.. ha.. when wielded properly.. in the hands of someone compassionate. ((If the "embarrassee" is someone who can be honest enough to admit they might be wrong.. and deserving of correction) But generally speaking.. it can really do a number on someone less conscientous. And for a prideful person.. it is the ultimate insult, to be sure.

PS, Kingrat.. thanks for your comments.

And I enjoyed hearing about the ladies and gents from SPWH.(and yes, it is a bit of propaganda as well as being a great story, perhaps. It does wave the flag pretty well, but that is not always a bad thing, now and then. (at least not to me, anyway) :D

And wow.. I did not realize there was such a difference in age between the two ladies and the two gentlemen. It fits Goddard's character though.. at least in spirit. I mean she seemed older and wiser than he did..and she spent most of the movie telling him what to do and where to go, etc. ha. But still, I don't think she was playing as old as her actual years. She carried it well though.

.
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Re: The April 2013 TCM Schedule

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JackFavell wrote:kingrat, sorry about the mixup with Moira's recommendation of Three Came Home. We had talked about this a couple of weeks ago on the other website, so I thought I had grabbed a share of credit that wasn't mine.

Thanks very much for the Flora Robson reminder... I am hoping that one of these movies is the one I've been looking for for years. There is a particular scene that has always stuck with me about women in wartime England and I still haven't found the film.
I think you might be thinking of 2,000 Women in which Robson (no surprise) shines. The movie also features what seems like every British actress in film of the period.

I'm looking forward to Robson's Day a lot since many of the movies on tap on Thursday are new to me.
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Re: The April 2013 TCM Schedule

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I did watch 2000 Women, which was very good even though it was not the film I remembered. I enjoyed it very much, sort of a Stage Door set in a prison camp (nice they let them dress up whenever they wanted). It was very suspenseful and kind of fun.

I had seen Great Day before, it turns out, and loved it. Alas, this was not the movie I had seen either. But it was well worth watching again, and now I'll remember the title. What a great cast, and some lovely shots of the countryside. A sort of down-at-heels opposite version of A Canterbury Tale.

I am most excited this month though, because a movie I've been waiting for is going to be on Monday night the 22nd at 4:15 AM. Lilly Turner, directed by William Wellman, is a Ruth Chatterton pre-code taking place in the seamy backstage at the carnival. I've read that Frank McHugh gives a heartbreaking performance in this movie, in a lead role too. I've been dying to see it ever since I read about it. Can't wait!!!!
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Re: The April 2013 TCM Schedule

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JackFavell wrote:I am most excited this month though, because a movie I've been waiting for is going to be on Monday night the 22nd at 4:15 AM. Lilly Turner, directed by William Wellman, is a Ruth Chatterton pre-code taking place in the seamy backstage at the carnival. I've read that Frank McHugh gives a heartbreaking performance in this movie, in a lead role too. I've been dying to see it ever since I read about it. Can't wait!!!!
Frank McHugh in a leading role!! I am there and thank you for the heads up. It's great that they are highlighting those early '30s Wellman films overnight on TCM that evening, with two of the very best of his early films preceding Lilly Turner:

(All times shown are ET)

12:15 AM
WINGS (1927)
In this silent film, romantic rivals fly against the enemy in World War I.
Dir: William A. Wellman Cast: Clara Bow , Charles [Buddy] Rogers , Richard Arlen .
BW-144 mins, TV-PG, CC,

3:00 AM
WILD BOYS OF THE ROAD (1933)
An impoverished girl masquerades as a boy to run with a gang of young hobos.
Dir: William A. Wellman Cast: Frankie Darro , Edwin Phillips , Rochelle Hudson .
BW-68 mins, TV-PG, CC,
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Re: The April 2013 TCM Schedule

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JackFavell wrote:Did anyone else watch Pierre Etaix? Gosh, I'm so glad I recorded him. It was a big treat. I instantly fell in love with him. The film Yo Yo was like a cross of Chaplin, Tati and Fellini. I was surprised because I had been thinking of Fellini all through the picture, then got a confirmation with a little in joke partway through... The circus comes to a city and discovers (by way of poster) that Gelsomina and Zampano have arrived before them. So they pack up and leave.
Wendy, I loved the few moments I saw of YOYO (1965), though I had to go out and couldn't record the evening at all. I have found that film online at the link below.

Good News! Criterion is coming out with a DVD of the five feature films and three shorts on April 23rd! Sounds great. The full length movies include The Suitor (1962), Yoyo (1965), As Long as You've Got Your Health (1966), Le Grand Amour (1969), and Land of Milk and Honey (1971) & the short subjects, Rupture (1961), the Oscar-winning Happy Anniversary (1962), and Feeling Good (1966).

I love the melancholy sweetness of these elegant films, (I'm particularly drawn to Etaix's Keatonesque expression) as well as the highly inventive use of sound. Great fun, though coming across people comparing him to Jerry Lewis would have made me run away if I had seen that mentioned before becoming intrigued by the movies:

[youtube][/youtube]
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Re: The April 2013 TCM Schedule

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The man was out of step with his own time, I think, and he's got a lovely spin on things. I'm SO happy we can now see his works. I had originally read about him at the movie morlocks page, so I immediately perked up when his name was mentioned here in this thread.

Yo-Yo
was a charming film, about generational differences, similarities and time passing. I love the way Etaix looks, and his sly sense of humor. The only other one I've watched all the way through so far is the more cynical Happy Anniversary! Which is hilariously on target about how marriage, routine and in-laws can take the love right out of a relationship.
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Re: The April 2013 TCM Schedule

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Giant 1956 Drama

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It's on Saturday Night on Prime Time 5PM PACIFIC and 8PM EASTERN STANDARD TIME ... I haven't seen this film in decades and I'm looking forward seeing it!
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Re: The April 2013 TCM Schedule

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The name of Stanley Morner was fourth in the credits of "Mama Runs Wild" (1937), shown this past Friday morning. "Stanley Morner...that'll be early Dennis Morgan won't it?" It was.

I've always liked him. He's nice. And handsome. Charming really. But just sort of...there, and I've never been enthusiastic. But I tell you: as "Mama..." ran, this near-sighted girl here was seated across the room. She wonders what squinting will do to her face ten ( twenty...thirty... ) years from now, so she tries to look just normally at the screen, and catch whatever she can. But the straight face couldn't be kept this time. I was squinting for Dennis Morgan.

After seeing the movie through, I went back and watched his scenes again. Seated closer. He was gorgeous. It's not just his looks: Morner isn't many years removed from Morgan. But there was something about him here. What is it? And how did it get lost? Studio training? Movie-star etiquette?

Will it come through in screen captures?

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Giving an afternoon show, with his coat unbuttoned, hands in his pockets. Part-way through the verse, he decides this is no way to treat an audience...

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Did anyone else see him in the movie? I've not just gone ga-ga over a silly lock of hair, have I?
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