Coming Up on TCM

Discussion of programming on TCM.

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pktrekgirl
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Post by pktrekgirl »

I've had my October guide for about 10 days now, minimum.

I live in Atlanta, though, and all mail from Florida comes through here. I expect they send them from Florida - and not from downtown...
My wife said she'd help young people, ... That's what I'd do. Help young people, then buy a big motor home and get out of town.
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benwhowell
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"...will find it hard to sleep tonight"

Post by benwhowell »

The December schedule looks like fun! Lots of pre codes and lots of William Wellman...the anniversary of his death? December, '75.
The Christmas fare is the usual stuff...not there's anything wrong with that, but I was hoping for some rare treats.
Also looking forward to "Thirteen Women," "Sweet Bird Of Youth," "Bonjour Tristesse" and "The Seventh Victim."
Plus the TCM Underground "punk" night with Penelope Spheeris' "Suburbia" and Derek Jarman's "Jubilee."
Who needs a stocking?
Handsome Johnny Eck
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Moraldo Rubini
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President Linkin'

Post by Moraldo Rubini »

Oh! I didn't know December was posted yet. That calls for a link!

Yippee! Idiot's Delight on a Thursday (my day off) in the afternoon. Followed by Theodora Goes Wild and The Awful Truth! Happy day! Happy day!

Dovzhenko's Earth! Haxan! Yippee!

Small Town Girl with Janet Gaynor and Robert Taylor. Okay, I'll see that...

Lady Of Burlesque!

Of course, Holiday In Mexico plays in the middle of the night... but I'm glad that I'll have another opportunity for Living In A Big Way...

Edna May Oliver alert: We're Rich Again Lots of Cary Grant, Irene Dunne, Ginger Rogers...
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Ayres
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Re: President Linkin'

Post by Ayres »

[quote="Moraldo Rubini"]Oh! I didn't know December was posted yet. That calls for a link!

Thanks for that! Welcoming in the New Year with Astaire and Rogers...'atsa nice!
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knitwit45
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Five little Peppers

Post by knitwit45 »

Moira! 2 of the "Five Little Peppers" movies are going to be shown on the 22nd of December!!!!!
Thought you'd want a heads up on this.

Nancy




9:00 AM Five Little Peppers and How They Grew (1939)
A case of measles gets a working class family mixed up with a blustering businessman's clan. Cast: Edith Fellows, Clarence Kolb, Dorothy Peterson. Dir: Charles Barton. C-56 mins,
10:15 AM Five Little Peppers at Home (1940)
Five siblings enlist a crusty old businessman to help save their mother from bankruptcy. Cast: Edith Fellows, Dorothy Ann Seese, Clarence Kolb. Dir: Charles Barton. C-65 mins,[/quote]
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moira finnie
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Re: Five little Peppers

Post by moira finnie »

knitwit45 wrote:Moira! 2 of the "Five Little Peppers" movies are going to be shown on the 22nd of December!!!!!
Thought you'd want a heads up on this.

Nancy

9:00 AM Five Little Peppers and How They Grew (1939)
A case of measles gets a working class family mixed up with a blustering businessman's clan. Cast: Edith Fellows, Clarence Kolb, Dorothy Peterson. Dir: Charles Barton. C-56 mins,
10:15 AM Five Little Peppers at Home (1940)
Five siblings enlist a crusty old businessman to help save their mother from bankruptcy. Cast: Edith Fellows, Dorothy Ann Seese, Clarence Kolb. Dir: Charles Barton. C-65 mins,
Thanks Nancy!
I seem to recall that you and I bonded some time ago over our apparently lone acquaintance with the Five Pepper kids, (hadn't you seen at least one of these films previously?)

I can't wait. One of the people who's quoted most extensively in Dick Moore's book about child actors, "Twinkle, twinkle, Little Star", was Edith Fellows, whose career I was pretty much unaware of up until coming across Moore's book, which is tragic and funny--sometimes simultaneously. It sounds as though these films might be good Holiday fare too! December's schedule looks pretty grand, all told.
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sugarpuss
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Post by sugarpuss »

I wound up getting my Now Playing guide Friday, but since I have to complain about *something*, I do NOT enjoy the little sticky circle tabs they used to keep it closed. Grumble, grumble. It always seems like I'm in the last round of people who get them.

I'm very excited about the December schedule, although I wonder how many movies will be switched and replaced by then. I remember in May, I was looking forward to seeing "How to Succeed In Business Without Really Trying" again only to have it replaced. Grumble, grumble, grumble.

Ben, "Bonjour Tristesse" is a pretty good, soap opera-y movie. I'm not a big Preminger fan, but of all his movies I've seen, this is my favorite. There's a gimmick of having the present day in black and white and the past in color, which works out quite nicely. But then I just enjoy anything with David Niven and Deborah Kerr, so I'm biased.

I'm also looking forward to Irene Dunne as Star of the Month. The last time I taped Show Boat, my dvd recorder went nuts on me and I didn't et to see it. It's a Universal movie and I have a feeling TCM's lease is going to expire this year for it. I was afraid I wouldn't have a chance to see it again. I'd like to see the differences in the two, 'cause I loved the '51 version.
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Rock the boat...

Post by benwhowell »

sugarpuss, somehow I haven't managed to see the '51 version of "Show Boat." (Or the '29 version.) James Whale's version is one of my favorite movie musicals and it has an effective melodramatic pre-code feel to it. Irene Dunne is great as Magnolia Hawks. (Her "shuffle" is a hoot!)
I also loved the playful relationship between Hattie McDaniel and Paul Robeson. Great "music video" montage with Robeson singing "Ol' Man River." Whale really captures Robeson's "sensuality." He must have been the first black male sex symbol in motion pictures...IMHO.
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jdb1

Post by jdb1 »

Sacre bleu, mes amis! What do I see on the October schedule but Zazie dans le Metro! (Zazie in the Subway) This is a 1960 Louis Malle film of a very popular French novella about an outspoken and precocious little girl and her wacky family and friends.

I well recall my French class in junior high being taken to Greenwich Village to see this movie (it couldn't have been on first run - I wasn't yet in junior high in 1960 - maybe a few years later). We had to have permission from our parents, because Zazie is sent to stay with her uncle, who is a cross-dresser, and because Zazie's mother has a - gasp - lover. I recall at least two kids who didn't get permission, and had to stay in school while we traipsed to the movies.

I remember virtually nothing about this film, other than it was one of the early ones in the chaotic style that became very popular in the 1960s (think Help!,the first Casino Royale, etc.). But I will be very interested to see it again.

Here's the trailer for Zazie

[youtube][/youtube]
jdb1

Post by jdb1 »

Milles pardons!

Zazie dan le Metro is scheduled to air on October 23 at 9:45 P.M.
jdb1

Post by jdb1 »

Just my two cents to point out some good ones, IMO, TCM has coming up at the end of October:

Mon., Oct. 29 @ 3:30 AM
Kwaidan, a Japanese movie from the 60s - a series of ghost stories, rather slow in pace, but very interesting. Apparently ghost stories loom large in Japanese literature. The stories in this movie were written down in English by the journalist Lafcadio Hearn, who lived in Japan in the 19th century.

Tues., Oct. 30 @ 4:00 PM
The Gene Krupa Story - not the best biopic ever, but worth seeing for Sal Mineo's amazing performance (made even more amazing by the fact that he was only 20 at the time). Seeing James Darren (not particularly good in this one) is nice, too, and there's also Susan Kohner.

Wed., Oct. 31 @ 12:30 AM
Body Snatcher - one of the best of Boris Karloff's horror movies of the 1940s.

Also, tonight On Golden Pond is showing again for the umpteenth time. I wish I had a recording to post of my daughter, who does a great Hepburn, doing the call of the loons. "Coo - coo - oo! Coo - coo -oo!" Makes me laugh every time.
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Post by Hollis »

Good morning,

Don't forget that "Mrs Miniver" is airing on Saturday morning at 6AM (est). This is a movie that I could watch once a month, every month. Too bad it's not shown as often as "Beach Blanket Bingo." It's early, but what better reason to get up with the sun?

As always,

Hollis
jdb1

Post by jdb1 »

I was looking over the November schedule. Just for the heck of it, I marked those films I think are especially noteworthy, and I'll share my thoughts with you. A lot of series are being run - Andy Hardy, Sherlock Holmes, Nancy Drew, Torchy and Maisie, and lots more. And among the standout features:

Nov. 2
Beauty and the Beast (8 PM) - As mentioned elsewhere, one of cinema's greats. In a rather stilted and artificial style, which fits the setting, where the actors wear 17th Century dress. Just beautiful.

Nov. 3
Divorce, Italian Style - (12 AM) This movie is hilarious. The "divorce" in the Italian style equals murder, and the arrogant Sicilian Barone Cefalu finds that to be not as easy as he thought.
Get Carter (2 AM) - Very strong English gangster movie, but extremely well done, with a sterling performance by Michael Caine as a small-time hood.

Nov. 6
One Spy Too Many (9:30 AM) - Feature from the "Man From U.N.C.L.E." TV series. Should be fun, as was the series. Oh, Napoleon. Ohhhh, Ilya.
On Golden Pond (10:15 PM) - What? Again? Can we all recite the dialog by heart yet? It looks like this is a guest programer choice, but really, if the guest (I think it's Chris Eliot) watches TCM, then he's also seen it sixty-leven times. Listen to the loons! Coo-coo-oo! Coo-coo-oo!

Nov. 7
This Sporting Life (10 PM) - Talk about strong. This study of the life of a brutish British rugby player (is there any other kind?) made Richard Harris a star. The theme song is good too - The Animals, I think.

Nov. 15
Today you can watch the Dead End Kids morph into the Bowery Boys in a series of B and C features. It's not a pleasant sight.

Nov. 16
Dodsworth (12 AM) - A great movie with great performances. If you haven't seen it yet, grab it.

Nov. 17
Fail Safe (4 PM) - Ditto. Very little action, but tense and scary as heck. H. Fonda is pitch-perfect. Plus, you'll appreciate "Dr. Strangelove" a lot more.
I'm All Right Jack (2 AM) - English workingclass comedy about labor (labour?) troubles. Haven't seen it in years, but I remember it being very popular when it came out in the early 60s.
The World of Henry Orient (4 AM) - A sweet, lovely movie about adolescent girls with a crush on a cad, learning that the world isn't all that easy once you grow up.

Nov. 18
Clash By Night (8 AM) - Wordy Odets play buoyed by terrific performances from Barbara Stanwyck, Robert Ryan, Paul Douglas and a newcomer called Marilyn Monroe. Oh, yeah, some guy named Fritz Lang directed it.

Nov. 20
Radio Time: In the morning, two films with Fibber McGee and Molly and other radio stars, and in the afternoon a series of "Great Gildersleeve" movies. Should be interesting.
The Happy Time (10:45 PM) - A nice movie about a teenage French-Canadian boy who discovers things other than crepes and pea soup, and how his family handles his maturing tastes.

Nov. 25
The Life & Death of Col. Blimp (11:30 PM) - An Englishman loves his country. Wonderful performances by Roger Livesey and Deborah Kerr.

Nov. 26
The Catered Affair (8 PM) - Bette Davis marries Ernest Borgnine (it could happen) and goes working class. Watch for our friend Mae Clarke in a bit part as the woman who makes Debbie Reynolds' wedding dress.
The Boy with the Green Hair (12:30 AM) - A fable about prejudice, with the remarkable Dean Stockwell as the title character.

Nov. 28
The Wrong Box (11:45 PM) - A wry British comedy about brothers feuding for an inheritance based, I believe, on a story by Rbt. Louis Stevenson. A funny sendup of Victorian mores.

Nov. 29
Juliet of the Spririts (12:30 AM) - Fellini puts his wife, Giulietta Masina, through a cinematic midlife crisis. She comes out a winner.
klondike

Post by klondike »

Yo, Brooklyn Gal!
If you're in a really night-owl mood, or have tape-space to spare, you might want to catch that next feature after Get Carter -
It's the slick-&-gritty John Boorman crime drama Point Blank, which not only inspired 90% of Mel Gibson's wickedly sharp Payback, but also afforded Lee Marvin one of his most demanding, and intriguing, roles.
So consider checking it out: it ain't for everyone, but then again, it never tried to be!
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Post by Bogie »

I've only seen Get Carter once (strangely I was in England at the time) and I found it to be a dreadful bore. Maybe I didn't give it enough of a chance as it was pretty late at night.

Most of the movies on your list i've seen but I have to second your recommendations. I especially loved The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp. Clash By Night is indeed wordy but very gritty for the time period. It's really cut in the same mold as Streetcar Named Desire and it contains great performances throughout.
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