The most important thing is to enjoy your life - to be happy - it's all that matters.
- Audrey Hepburn

What are you reading?

Films, TV shows, and books of the 'modern' era

Moderators: Sue Sue Applegate, movieman1957, moira finnie, Lzcutter

User avatar
MichiganJ
Posts: 1406
Joined: May 20th, 2008, 4:37 pm
Contact:

Re: What are you reading?

Postby MichiganJ » March 31st, 2011, 5:09 pm

" dennycranelaw.com Pictures, bios, hobbies. I once captained my own spaceship. Multi-talented." -- Denny Crane
"Let's be independent together." Dr. Hermey DDS

User avatar
CharlieT
Posts: 404
Joined: May 7th, 2007, 8:28 pm
Location: Warren G. Harding's hometown

Re: What are you reading?

Postby CharlieT » March 31st, 2011, 8:22 pm

Finished The Old Curiosity Shop and BBC DVD, went on to read Ben Franklin's autobiography and am currently reading Nicholas Nickleby.
"I'm at my most serious when I'm joking." - Dudley

Don't sweat the petty things - don't pet the sweaty things.

User avatar
MichiganJ
Posts: 1406
Joined: May 20th, 2008, 4:37 pm
Contact:

Re: What are you reading?

Postby MichiganJ » April 4th, 2011, 3:10 pm

This weekend I finished The Horror! The Horror!: Comic Books the Government Didn't Want You To Read, which is about the pre-Code horror comics of the 50s. While author Jim Trombetta may look a little too deeply into the significance of a particular story, he nevertheless provides plenty of insight and his overall analysis of the various sub-genres (ie: werewolves, gorgons, cannibals, skeletons, etc) is quite interesting. Best of all are the actual comics themselves; 16-complete strips of comics the Government was sure would warp the minds and spines of 8-year olds of all ages. The strips vary in actual oomph, but many do pack a heck-of-a wallop and the art work is terrific. Also included are full page replications of the comic cover art, and these are extraordinary in all their wonderful, colorful gruesomeness; all vying to catch the eye (and the dime) of the youngsters willing to have their minds (and spines) warped.
"Let's be independent together." Dr. Hermey DDS

User avatar
Rita Hayworth
Posts: 10098
Joined: February 6th, 2011, 4:01 pm

Re: What are you reading?

Postby Rita Hayworth » April 4th, 2011, 3:53 pm

MichiganJ wrote:This weekend I finished The Horror! The Horror!: Comic Books the Government Didn't Want You To Read, which is about the pre-Code horror comics of the 50s.


I agree with you 100%

User avatar
MichiganJ
Posts: 1406
Joined: May 20th, 2008, 4:37 pm
Contact:

Re: What are you reading?

Postby MichiganJ » April 4th, 2011, 4:34 pm

kingme wrote:
MichiganJ wrote:This weekend I finished The Horror! The Horror!: Comic Books the Government Didn't Want You To Read, which is about the pre-Code horror comics of the 50s.


I agree with you 100%

If you liked The Horror! The Horror! I'd also highly recommend The Weird World of Eerie Publications: Comic Gore That Warped Millions of Young Minds. It's a fascinating read about publisher Myron Fass who essentially plagiarized the art and stories from pre-Code comics and put them in his own Eerie Publications in the 60s/70s. (Note: Eerie Publications had nothing to do with the terrific EC magazine named Eerie.)

The book includes more great artwork, but this time you often see the original artwork next to the artwork Fass used. The guy had no compunction about blatantly stealing, and even wound up stealing from himself from time to time.
"Let's be independent together." Dr. Hermey DDS

User avatar
JackFavell
Posts: 11946
Joined: April 20th, 2009, 9:56 am

Re: What are you reading?

Postby JackFavell » April 6th, 2011, 11:21 am

Forgive me, I haven't read this whole thread, something I usually do if I am posting. Has anyone read The Olive Farm, by All Creatures Great and Small alum Carol Drinkwater?

It is in a genre that has become very popular, and I am embarrassed to say that I fall for it most of the time - woman goes to a European country, finds a house to renovate and learns something along the way.

Well, usually after reading one of these books, I think to myself, "I fell for it again. This book is disappointing. " But this particular book is really surprising - it's quite well written. Ms. Drinkwater's adventures are skillfully drawn and usually funny. She really knows how to play out a story for maximum effect. The thing I really like about The Olive Farm is that she does research and talks about the history of many things French - the olive, a secret monastery on an island, wild boar, Cannes, almost anything she comes in contact with has a history that is fascinating. It's well worth the trip to the library, and apparently, she's written more books about her experiences as an ex-pat with a ramshackle house near Cannes. She makes you want to buy her books, just knowing that the money you spent might help her renovate her dilapidated home.

User avatar
charliechaplinfan
Posts: 9087
Joined: January 15th, 2008, 9:49 am

Re: What are you reading?

Postby charliechaplinfan » April 6th, 2011, 1:25 pm

I've heard very good reviews of that book Wendy.

I'm trying to decide what books to take on holiday, I always take double what I actually read. I've picked up a copy of Kate by William J Mann in a bargain bin, so far so good although as a gay man he seems to have an agenda. I nearly put it down but after reading his ackowledgements, references and foreward decided to give it a try. It runs for over 500 pages.

I've ordered Furious Love from a online retailer, not Amazon this time, I shan't be using them again as it seems that they can't promise delivery on time.

Other books I'm thinking of taking are The Woman Nobody Knew about Jean Arthur and Orson Welles The Road to Xanadu by Simon Callow.

If I read one I'll be lucky :wink:
Failure is unimportant. It takes courage to make a fool of yourself - Charlie Chaplin

User avatar
JackFavell
Posts: 11946
Joined: April 20th, 2009, 9:56 am

Re: What are you reading?

Postby JackFavell » April 6th, 2011, 1:37 pm

I've been wanting to read the Simon Callow book(s) for a long time.

I love Jean Arthur, I wonder if the author could possibly have found out anything - she seemed pretty reclusive.

The Olive Farm is a very simple book, one of it's charms. I think anyone who likes France or maybe Italy and dreams of living there would love it.

feaito

Re: What are you reading?

Postby feaito » April 6th, 2011, 3:06 pm

Take the Jean Arthur Bio Alison, it's a good a read. :wink:

User avatar
charliechaplinfan
Posts: 9087
Joined: January 15th, 2008, 9:49 am

Re: What are you reading?

Postby charliechaplinfan » April 7th, 2011, 1:47 pm

It's packed, I haven't put the Welles book in, it looks like it could easily get damaged.
Failure is unimportant. It takes courage to make a fool of yourself - Charlie Chaplin

User avatar
charliechaplinfan
Posts: 9087
Joined: January 15th, 2008, 9:49 am

Re: What are you reading?

Postby charliechaplinfan » April 8th, 2011, 3:36 am

I've been tempted by a book about Joan Crawford written by Charlotte Chandler, I remember Casey speaking well of her but when I put her name into Amazon there have been loads of books that she has writtewn recently on the big stars and some directors. That tends to put me off, she can't have absorbed their lives to the extent I like when reading a biography. Has anyone read any of her books or seen her interviewed. I wouldn't be risking a lot, her books are pence plus postage. For the same money there is a recent book about Joan by Donald Spoto that has pages more. Does anyone have any thoughts about which author to chose. Both are recent so hopefully will look at Joan objectively and restore soon of the balance that casey talked about.
Failure is unimportant. It takes courage to make a fool of yourself - Charlie Chaplin

User avatar
Rita Hayworth
Posts: 10098
Joined: February 6th, 2011, 4:01 pm

Re: What are you reading?

Postby Rita Hayworth » April 8th, 2011, 4:37 pm

People Magazine, April 11th, 2011
Article on Elizabeth Taylor - Farewell to a Legend

People Magazine did an excellent article that is several pages along and packed with great photographs, did a wonderful job recapping her career; did a nice recap of the men she loved and so forth. Also, packed with incredible photos of her fabulous jewelry that she wore during her life. Boy, she does loved her emeralds and diamonds. And, Pearls too.

I wanted to stay that People Magazine did a wonderful job putting it all together and I know that we are all going to miss her and she is definitely one of the kind here - her beauty has no bounds.

I normally don't buy Magazines at the Supermarket - but when I saw this People Magazine - I had to buy it and reflect her wonderful career as an actress. Giant, Cleopatra, Raintree County, National Velvet, Butterfield 8, Cat on Hot Tin Roof, Who Afraid of Virginia Woolf, and dozen and dozen of classic throughout the ages - she was portrayed very nicely in this magazine.

One thing (after being a member now for 2 months) ... one of the Moderators (I think) told everyone that she made her own slip in Butterfield 8 - and People Magazine has a great photograph of it. I did not know that she makes her own clothes - let alone an woman undergarment for a particular movie. That's a talent that I did not know - until I joined this great forum.

But, anyway ... friends - I loved reading this magazine and its made me look back the legendary career in a different perspective. Older, I get ... the more I learned to love her. She by far my favorite brunette actress of all times.

Great Magazine Friends

User avatar
Papermoon
Posts: 18
Joined: April 8th, 2011, 6:09 pm
Location: Mid-Hudson Valley NY
Contact:

Re: What are you reading?

Postby Papermoon » April 10th, 2011, 8:23 pm

I just started No Bed Of Her Own by Val Lewton( Yes, the one we classic film fans all know and love)
http://precodevixen.blogspot.com(my blog, come and visit)

User avatar
JackFavell
Posts: 11946
Joined: April 20th, 2009, 9:56 am

Re: What are you reading?

Postby JackFavell » April 11th, 2011, 7:16 am

Awesome! Whenever I see the documentary about Lewton, I always think I should try and find it!

feaito

Re: What are you reading?

Postby feaito » April 19th, 2011, 10:33 am

I finished Simon Louvish's Bio on Mae West, a good, informative, scholarly book and now I'm reading Scott O'Brien's Bio on Kay Francis "I Can'T Wait to be Forgotten" (the Expanded 2nd Edition) and so far so good. I like Mr. O'Brien's writing sytle (having already read his Bios on Ann Harding -excellent- and Virginia Bruce -very good).

I had previously read Kear's & Rossman's Bio on Kay, but although informative and well researched I did not find it very entertaining.


Return to “General TV and Media”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests