"Go, girl, go!"

Isn't Romantic Comedy redundant?

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benwhowell
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"Go, girl, go!"

Post by benwhowell »

"Asta" la vista?

I enjoyed the musical numbers and glorious Technicolor of "Let's Do It Again-"not to mention that fabulous mid-century Manhattan apartment...Jane Wyman had a great time "channeling" Irene Dunne, but Ray Milland's role just wasn't "meaty" enough for him and there wasn't much chemistry between them.
Overall-no match for the hilarity and the wonderful pairing of Irene Dunne and Cary Grant (and Asta, of course) in "The Awful Truth."
Which one is your favorite?
Handsome Johnny Eck
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Moraldo Rubini
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Re: "Go, girl, go!"

Post by Moraldo Rubini »

benwhowell wrote:"Asta" la vista?

I enjoyed the musical numbers and glorious Technicolor of "Let's Do It Again-"not to mention that fabulous mid-century Manhattan apartment...Jane Wyman had a great time "channeling" Irene Dunne, but Ray Milland's role just wasn't "meaty" enough for him and there wasn't much chemistry between them.
Overall-no match for the hilarity and the wonderful pairing of Irene Dunne and Cary Grant (and Asta, of course) in "The Awful Truth."
Which one is your favorite?
No question about it: The Awful Truth is precisely cut gem; Let's Do It Again is a mood ring.

I didn't even realize it was remake until the fabulously horrible nightclub number, sung and danced by the blousy and brassy Valerie Bettis. Her striptease number "The Call of the Wild" turns into a bizarre sex fantasy as she sings, "I want jungle love...", as hefty male dancers in mock African tribal costumes (these weren't blackface, but rather blackbody). The dialogue of the embarrassed Ray Milland was similar to Cary Grant's in the "Gone with the Wind" number from The Awful Truth.

Aldo Ray was a sexier version of Dan Lesson, but Ralph Bellamy's held more of an oafish charm. Cecil Cunningham's lines (as Aunt Patsy) were given to the maid (Mary Treen), who didn't share Cunningham's impeccable timing.

Wyman's costumes were the star of this picture. She never looked better nor more glamorous (sorry, Mr. Sirk). But overall it was a clumsy effort.

I understand there are a couple of silent versions of this movie. Anyone seen them? Do they still exist?
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