Edward G. Robinson

Discussion of the actors, directors and film-makers who 'made it all happen'

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RedRiver
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Re: Edward G. Robinson

Post by RedRiver »

Are you seriously telling me WOMAN IN THE WINDOW is considered superior to SCARLET STREET? I must bridle my sarcasm; no need to be disrespectful. But that's like ranking LOVE'S LABOURS LOST ahead of HAMLET! I think "Scarlet" is much better!

I love him in Double Indemnity.

The man's very best work.
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charliechaplinfan
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Re: Edward G. Robinson

Post by charliechaplinfan »

I liked them both but I think Scarlet Street has the edge for me. How good is Joan Bennett? She's the ability to match any leading man whatever the material.
Failure is unimportant. It takes courage to make a fool of yourself - Charlie Chaplin
Western Guy
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Re: Edward G. Robinson

Post by Western Guy »

I certainly do not consider WOMAN IN THE WINDOW to be superior to SCARLET STREET. The former is entertaining and the cast does wonderful work, but the ending is such a cop-out - pretty much sinks all that has gone before. I really resent those cheat endings. I do think, however, that WOMAN IN THE WINDOW is more highly regarded (if I'm not mistaken Leonard Maltin, for one, gives it a higher "star" rating than SCARLET STREET in his Annual Movie Guide). Even Eddie himself in his autobiography speaks more favorably of it than he does of SCARLET STREET.

But I'm in complete disagreement. SCARLET STREET is stark and dark and utterly compelling. And those final scenes just leave you numb. A true noirish classic.
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Professional Tourist
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Re: Edward G. Robinson

Post by Professional Tourist »

Well, I'll chime in here after all and admit that I did not care for Scarlet Street at all. Well-made though it may have been, when I do not like all (or most) of the characters and do not like the story, then I don't like a movie. I really don't enjoy a story about a patsy and the people who abuse and take advantage of him.

I will try The Woman in the Window soon and see how I feel about it.
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JackFavell
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Re: Edward G. Robinson

Post by JackFavell »

It is a painful watch, PT, but I just love the way it tells that very dark story.

I haven't seen WITW yet. I've been putting it off, I'm not sure why = either because I don't want it to be a disappointment, or I don't want to run out of great Lang movies too soon. The reviews I've read all say Scarlet Street is better. I am still miffed at that blogger I read (can't remember who it was) who gave away the ending of the movie, no spoiler alert or anything. I guess I was hoping to forget what I read before I watched it.
Western Guy
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Re: Edward G. Robinson

Post by Western Guy »

Reviews at the time were not as kind to SCARLET STREET (with some comparing it unfavorably, but understandably) to WOMAN IN THE WINDOW), but I do believe its reputation has grown in recent years. I think one of the reasons Eddie was not too fond of the film was because he was undergoing some personal and professional troubles at the time and perhaps the darker aspects of the story hit a little close to home. He wrote of not being that admiring of another dark-themed story THE RED HOUSE, a movie he co-produced.
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Professional Tourist
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Re: Edward G. Robinson

Post by Professional Tourist »

Well then, Mr. Robinson and I agree on both Scarlet and Red. I didn't like The Red House either -- it was all I could do to sit through it. I found the story a little too ridiculous and soap-opera-ish.

But I must admit I did like Soylent Green especially his character, and All My Sons is superb. :)

P.S. I'd like to add that I don't have an issue with dark-themed stories if I like the characters and the story itself. Sweeney Todd, for example, is a very dark story which I appreciate a lot.
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JackFavell
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Re: Edward G. Robinson

Post by JackFavell »

Yes, that makes sense that it was not popular at the time, I understand now.
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Professional Tourist
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Re: Edward G. Robinson

Post by Professional Tourist »

I've watched The Woman in the Window tonight and liked it very much -- to my thinking it is far better than Scarlet Street.

In TWITW, with just one exception, we have good, decent, intelligent, basically happy people. No patsies, no abusers, no one fleecing or making a fool of others and/or allowing it to be done to them, again with just one exception the "bad guy." That's a big difference from SS, which makes all the difference to me. I like the characters here -- they're human and they makes some bad choices which are followed by some bad luck, and therein lies the story. A good, interesting tale of moral dilemma. As others have mentioned, I too didn't care for the ending, which pretty much negates the conflict/climax, the most interesting parts of the story. I don't know why they decided to end it that way, unless there may have been an issue with the production code if they had ended it in the way the picture was headed.

Anyway, to each his own, but I cannot imagine preferring SS to TWITW.
Interesting that they used the same three leads in both pictures.
Western Guy
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Re: Edward G. Robinson

Post by Western Guy »

You know, PT, if WOMAN IN THE WINDOW had a different ending I might have preferred it to SCARLET STREET, because you bring up valid points about the characters, plus there is that almost Columbo aspect to the proceedings. But I feel cheated by films that end the way WITW did. Nay, as a viewer, insulted.
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charliechaplinfan
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Re: Edward G. Robinson

Post by charliechaplinfan »

Scarlet Street has the edge for me because it is unrelenting, I did like Woman in the Window but thought the ending was unexpected. I can see why some would prefer WITW but I like the edge in Scarlet Street, it makes it for me.
Failure is unimportant. It takes courage to make a fool of yourself - Charlie Chaplin
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movieman1957
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Re: Edward G. Robinson

Post by movieman1957 »

I watched Larceny, Inc for the first time in about 30 years. It's a fun way to spend 95 minutes. Wonderful performances and a fun premise. Robinson is wonderful about being bothered with running a luggage store while trying to get into the bank next door. He inadvertently becomes a hero to the local shop owners and changes his view of them and becomes successful at his business.

Special notice goes to Broderick Crawford as a lunk head who is always trying to do things the quickest way but not really the smartest way. Edward Brophy is also quite funny as one of the partners. You'll even find a baby faced Jackie Gleason in a small role.

Lloyd Bacon directs is a pretty crisp pace and even shows some manic reactions when the boys hit a few things in the basement. The opening baseball scene will give you a hint about the fun to come.

Jack Carson, Jane Wyman and Anthony Quinn are all along for the ride.

Watch it and enjoy.
Chris

"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana."
Mr. Arkadin
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Re: Edward G. Robinson

Post by Mr. Arkadin »

movieman1957 wrote:I watched Larceny, Inc for the first time in about 30 years. It's a fun way to spend 95 minutes. Wonderful performances and a fun premise. Robinson is wonderful about being bothered with running a luggage store while trying ot get into the bank next door. He inadvertently becomes a hero to the local shop owners and changes his view of them and becomes successful at his business.

Special notice goes to Broderick Crawford as a lunk head who is always trying to do the things the quickest but not really the smartest way. Edward Brophy is also quite funny as one of the partners. You'll even find a baby faces Jackie Gleason in a small role.

Lloyd Bacon directs is a pretty crisp pace and even shows some manic reactions when the boys hit a few things in the basement. The opening baseball scene will give you a hint about the fun to come.

Jack Carson, Jane Wyman and Anthony Quinn are all along for the ride.

Watch it and enjoy.
Nothing like buying a suitcase for $9.75. :mrgreen:


On another note, I'd like to mention that TCM will finally be showing Blackmail (1939) on the 8th of this month. This is nice film, which owes a lot to I am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang (1932), but adds a bit of humor and is not as gritty as the precode. Still, it's a nice little gem and I don't think TCM has shown it in about 9 years.
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JackFavell
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Re: Edward G. Robinson

Post by JackFavell »

Nice review of Larceny, Inc. I really enjoy this movie. Love any movie with the 'dese and dose' guys in it, especially Brophy. Jack Carson is terrific as always as an always 'on' wholesale salesman. The cast here is everything.

How many times have I wished to go into a classic movie to shop! $9.75 suitcases, dresses for 10 bucks.... :D

Thanks also for the heads up on Blackmail, Mr. Ark. I would have missed it if you hadn't mentioned it.
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movieman1957
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Re: Edward G. Robinson

Post by movieman1957 »

Thanks. Another pint size comment on a film. I went and reread it and it seems I may have been asleep. Wrong words and a misspelling.
Chris

"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana."
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