Do You Know Me?

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Sue Sue Applegate
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Post by Sue Sue Applegate »

Baddabing! And back to you, Mistress of Mystery Guests.....

I also adored her in The Major and the Minor, which I think was her first major screen role, which is amazing if you watch her first scene.....
or all of them.
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Avatar: Ginger Rogers, The Major and The Minor
jdb1

Post by jdb1 »

OK, Fellow Trivians, try this one:

Do you know me?

I was born in central Europe, and had a charming accent, but I rarely played European characters. Rather, I was generally cast as Asian in various genre movies, although I did appear in westerns and crime dramas as well, always as a foreign-born character. My acting career may be considered somewhat modest by Hollywood standards, but it has spanned over 60 years, with my most recent appearances being on a syndicated TV series.

In one of my films, I played opposite America's number one actress (according to one listing). She required a much more extensive makeover to play her part than I did. It wasn't one of her more successful roles, although she did give it her usual energetic Yankee best.

Who am I?
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knitwit45
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Post by knitwit45 »

Would our mystery guest be Akim Tamiroff?
feaito

Post by feaito »

I'm going to guess Turhan Bey...
jdb1

Post by jdb1 »

Good tries for both of you. Turhan Bey was the gentleman I had in mind.

Bey very often played Turks in his films. His father was Turkish, but his mother was Czech, and Bey was born in Vienna. He was in many foreign-intrigue type movies, but also in not some very good costume movies with Arabian Nights and other exotic themes.

He co-starred with the very curiously cast Katharine Hepburn in "Dragon Seed" (Akim Tamiroff is also in this movie), where they were valiant Chinese peasants trekking across the countryside, battling the invading Japanese. You have to see this to believe it, and even then, you won't believe it. But Kate dug in and gave it her usual high degree of commitment, even if the results were less than stellar.

In recent years, Bey has appeared on several TV shows, including Murder, She Wrote, and made several appearances on Babylon 5.
jdb1

Post by jdb1 »

Here's another, which I thought of based on the last Mystery Guest.

Like the previous Mystery Guest, I was born in Europe. My parents were circus performers and, travelling with them I wound up in China, where I worked as a very young singer/dancer in western-style cafes in China's most westernized city. I scraped together enough money to get to the US, where I worked briefly in vaudeville, until I was discovered by a Broadway producer, who put me in a show where I was a sensation. Another part I played on Broadway was subsequently played by Ginger Rogers in the movie version.

The word "hot" was frequently used to describe me, and although I made only a few movies, in most of them I was the incendiary blonde. In one of my better films I was the maid in the Brooklyn household of Claudette Colbert. In another, I made fun of Greta Garbo in the kind of part Garbo would never have played. Unfortunately, my health was not good, and I passed away at a much too young age. I am forgotten now for the most part, but I hope not by Classic Hollywood buffs.

Who am I?
feaito

Post by feaito »

Lyda Roberti?
jdb1

Post by jdb1 »

feaito wrote:Lyda Roberti?
Primer premio, Fernando!

Roberti was a fabulous comic actress who was born to play screwball comedies. She was a cabaret performer in Shanghai, China, and after a short stint in vaudeville in the US, she scored big hits in several Broadway shows of the late 20s She made 15 films; some of them shorts where she replaced Thelma Todd in one-reelers with Patsy Kelly.

She was generally the femme fatale, but in Three Cornered Moon, she played the hapless maid to Claudette Colbert's bohemian family. She is wonderful in my all-time favorite comedy, Million Dollar Legs, as Mata Machree, "The Woman No Man Can Resist," with an outrageous pseudo-Swedish accent. One of the other characters calls her a "Swedish Tease." She sings a hootchy-coochy song called "When I Get Hot."

Roberti had such great potential, but a heart condition killed her in her early 30s.
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CharlieT
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Post by CharlieT »

It's been a few days since any activity has appeared on this thread, so I thought I'd offer a simple one for all you geniuses.

I was born in Canada and my early talents led me to stage work. I've not only appeared on Broadway, but plied my talents as a writer. I even played the starring role in one of the most famous plays ever written for the American stage. I also wrote the lyrics to a song destined to become a million seller.

I appeared in more than 140 films and TV shows playing a losing politician, an abused worker, a corrupt sheriff and a jurist in a tight spot. I played the father-in-law of one of history's biggest losers and father to a grown son who wouldn't listen to his father's wishes when he opposed his marriage to one beneath their station.

I appeared in one film with my wife, who was English born, and my only child.

More than enough clues to make this a slam-dunk.

Who am I?
"I'm at my most serious when I'm joking." - Dudley

Don't sweat the petty things - don't pet the sweaty things.
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ken123
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Post by ken123 »

Hume Cronyn. :wink:
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CharlieT
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Post by CharlieT »

Sorry, ken, not Mr. C.

Clue: My child found more fame in TV than the movies.

Who am I?
"I'm at my most serious when I'm joking." - Dudley

Don't sweat the petty things - don't pet the sweaty things.
jdb1

Post by jdb1 »

I think it's Gene Lockhart. He was born in Canada, was in many films, and replaced Lee J. Cobb in Death of a Salesman on Broadway. His wife, Kathleen Lockhart, and his daughter, June Lockhart, appeared with him in the 1938 version of A Christmas Carol. June Lockhart went on to a successful career in television, in such series as Lassie, and Lost in Space.

In addition, Lockhart wrote the lyrics to one of my favorite songs "Dear One, the World is Waiting for the Sunrise," recorded so very nicely by Les Paul and Mary Ford (and played, on bedsprings substituting for a harp, by Stan Laurel in, was it Flying Deuces?)
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movieman1957
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Post by movieman1957 »

Judith:

You're right about Stan playing bedsprings in "Flying Deuces."
Chris

"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana."
jdb1

Post by jdb1 »

Thanks, Chris.
We haven't gotten the definitive word from Charlie, but in the meantime here's one:

Who am I?

I had a busy life, but there isn't all that much biographical material about me. It's hard to believe I was born two centuries ago. I graduated from a prestigious law school, but law wasn't exciting enough for me, so I went to Broadway. I quickly became a favorite of George M. Cohan, and was cast in his, and many other plays. I made a film version of one of his plays, and decided to try my luck in Hollywood. The advent of sound brought me more success than I had had in the silents.

I was usually somebody's father or grandfather, or a judge, or the president of a bank. I played drama and comedy equally well. I was one of those characters whose face was familiar to more than one generation of moviegoers.

I was also a founding member of both Actor's Equity and the Screen Actor's Guild.

And do you know me?
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CharlieT
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Post by CharlieT »

Hi, Judith.

Yes, it was Gene Lockhart. He played Stephen Douglas losing to Abe Lincoln in Abe Lincoln in Illinois, an abused Bob Cratchit in A Christmas Carol, the corrupt sheriff in His Girl Friday, the judge who had to rule if Santa Claus was real in Miracle on 34th Street, father-in-law to George Armstrong Custer in They Died With Their Boots On and Ted Harris, Sr. in Going My Way, not wanting his son to marry beneath his station.

You were right on with the other clues.

Thanks for letting me jump in for a quick one. :D
"I'm at my most serious when I'm joking." - Dudley

Don't sweat the petty things - don't pet the sweaty things.
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