Q & A for Dana Andrews' Biographer, Carl Rollyson

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Re: Q & A for Dana Andrews' Biographer

Post by Carl_Rollyson »

JackFavell wrote:Hi, Carl! It's great to have you at the Oasis this weekend. I am very excited about your book!

You mentioned that Dana played the role of Tom in The Glass Menagerie. I can't think of a better person to play this role! I only wish I could go back in time to see this performance. Do you have any more information about this play, the role, how Dana felt about it, what the reviewers thought, his co-stars, how he approached acting, etc?
DANA PLAYED TOM IN SUMMER STOCK AND SO REVIEWS WERE MAINLY ANNOUNCEMENTS OF PERFORMANCES. I DON'T THINK A MAJOR CRITIC EVER REVIEWED DANA'S PERFORMANCE IN THE PLAY, AND THAT IS A SHAME. DANA KNEW TENNESSEE WILLIAMS AND HAD GREAT RESPECT FOR HIS WORK. I WOULD HAVE LOVED TO TALK TO WALTER MATTHAU (I DID FOR MY BIOGRAPHY OF LILLIAN HELLMAN0, BUT MATTHAU WAS GONE BY THE TIME I BEGAN WORK ON MY DANA ANDREWS BIOGRAPHY. DANA'S CHILDREN WERE TOO YOUNG TO HAVE A CLEAR IDEA OF HIS PERFORMANCE. THE BEST PERSON TO EVALUATE HIM WOULD HAVE BEEN HIS WIFE MARY. SHE WAS HIS BEST CRITIC. BUT MARY, TOO, WAS GONE BY THE TIME I BEGAN MY BOOK.
I feel a lot of frustration in Dana's best performances, and some self loathing... was this a part of his makeup in real life, or was it all just what he made up for the characters?

I DON'T THINK SELF-LOATHING WAS PART OF THE MAN EVEN IF IT COMES OUT IN HIS CHARACTERS. HE FELT VERY FORTUNATE AND VERY HAPPY. SOME MIGHT THINK HIS ALCOHOLISM REFLECTS UNHAPPINESS OR SELF-LOATHING. BUT I DON'T THINK SO. WHAT I DO THINK I'LL SAVE FOR ANOTHER POST.
This is related to the last question - You say he liked to get away from Hollywood, was he a big family man? Or was he reticent with his family? I sense an introspection that maybe kept him from fully enjoying himself even when at home? But perhaps that's just something I am getting from his characters.
DANA CAME FROM A BIG TEXAS FAMILY, AND HE WAS A BIG FAMILY MAN. HIS CHILDREN ADORE HIM. I DO THINK, THOUGH, HE KEPT CERTAIN THINGS TO HIMSELF AND UNDERSTOOD CHARACTERS WHO WANTED TO DO THE SAME.
How did he and Fonda get along? It's pretty amazing to say that in Daisy Kenyon, it is Andrews who walks off with the better performance. Did they have a rapport?
HENRY FONDA HAD GREAT RESPECT FOR DANA AS AN ACTOR. REMEMBER THERE WERE IN THE OX-BOW INCIDENT TOGETHER. I THINK FONDS DOES VERY WELL IN DAISY KENYON, BUT WHAT CAN I SAY? I'M PARTIAL TO DANA.
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Re: Q & A for Dana Andrews' Biographer

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stuart.uk wrote:Hi Carl

I'm from the UK and I can't pretend to be a great expert on Dana Andrew movies, in fact surprisingly enough I'm more familair about his brother Steve Forrest and that's mainly due to his 1965 UK action adventure series The Baron with Sue Llyod. I don't know if the brother's ever worked together, but given Forrest's tv stature it might have been possible for him to cast his aging brother in shows like The Baron or SWAT

However, one great compliment I can pay Dana is that despite the presence of Henry Fonda in the starring role, his perfomance in the OX Bow Incident is the hightlight of a classic film.

It's also fair to say in my opinion that The Best Years Of Our Lives is one of if not the best films about returning American soldiers from the war, though I think Guy Madison (In roughly the Andrews role) in TIll The End Of Time runs it close. I did hear that at one point Audie Murphy was planing a sequel to To Hell And Back, about soldiers returning home. It's a pity he never made it, I think he would have highlighted the imotional truma that soldiers suffered after returning from the battlefield.

It's years since I've seen them, but I remember two westerns Dana made, Strange Lady In Town with Greer Grason and a 60s film Town Tamer

Stuart
I'M GLAD YOU MENTION TOWN TAMER. IT IS AVAILABLE, BY THE WAY, AS A DOWLOAD ON NETFLIX. I LIKE THIS WESTERN BECAUSE DANA PLAYS AN AGING HERO EXTREMELY WELL. IT IS NOT A GREAT FILM BUT CERTAINLY A GOOD ONE.
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Re: Q & A for Dana Andrews' Biographer

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Unlike most biographies of actors which always make their lives before success seem rather dull, I found that Dana Andrews' complex relationship with his father and his experiences as a youth to be quite moving in your book. This was especially so since the journal entries and letters your biography uses gives us a glimpse of his internal struggles. I used to think that Dana Andrews portrayed guys who had a rough time in life quite realistically. Now I can see that his acting was rooted in reality.


Carl, could you please discuss Dana Andrews' very large family, his growing up in Texas, and why he decided to become an actor as a young man during The Depression?
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Re: Q & A for Dana Andrews' Biographer

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Hello Mr. Rollyson,

Dana Andrews is one of my favorite actors … “favorite actor” to me, often means someone who I’ll watch even in a poor film, just to see them. The earliest roles I saw Andrews in were Zero Hour! , The Best Years of Our Lives, and Three Hours to Kill. He made a strong impression in each role (Zero Hour!, despite Airport!, I think holds up remarkably well as a serious drama.)

I’ve also found many of his radio performances, on shows like Suspense and Lux Radio Theater. Hearing him on radio makes me appreciate all the more his wonderfully rich, expressive voice and talent for conveying so much with it. I hesitate to add to your already long list of questions, but does your book give a complete list of Andrew’s radio performances, by any chance?
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Re: Q & A for Dana Andrews' Biographer

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Welcome to the Oasis and thank you for spending a little time telling us about your enigmatic subject. Count me as an admirer, Laura being one of those seminal classic films that ushered me into my lifelong love of movies. It never pales, and I believe Dana was the quintessential movie detective. Where The Sidewalk Ends is probably my second-favorite performance. Like Fallen Angel, it is complex but redemptive. And I agree with the others who admire his remarkable speaking voice. He may never have sung much in film, but I think he made more of an impact as an actor with his unique voice than a hundred others who sang their hearts out.

Did Dana have any preference about working in film vs. stage? Many performers then and even now, felt more serious about theater work and often played down their movie work. Do you think Dana would be surprised by all the interest and critical attention his movies receive today?

My favorite director is John Ford, but Tobacco Road is not a favorite film and Dana's part is very small, though he's just about the most genial character in the film. I wonder if there was anything of interest that happened during his one experience working with Ford?

Finally, Linda Crystal happens to be a great favorite of mine. You really piqued my interest when you said she was the exception in his life, personally. Have you spoken with Miss Crystal, did she share any of her memories of Dana for your book?

P.S. Okay, one more. I understand that Dana didn't make many friendships within Hollywood circles, however I have read he and another favorite of mine, Robert Ryan, were friends. Can you elaborate a little on what interests or points of view they shared that drew them together? I believe Ryan was also not into Hollywood socializing and both men remind me of one another in their complexity as actors. Did they ever work together in a film? I'm drawing a blank on that at that moment.

Thank you again for being here.
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Thank you for being here

Post by clore »

I've been a fan of Dana Andrews since the year 1965 where I saw him in six theatrical releases and discovered LAURA and BOOMERANG! on TV. I had seen him in other films earlier, but at that point I was a bit too young to be paying attention to anyone who wasn't SKY KING. Somewhere around here, I have some saved documents, printed from an oral history that Mr. Andrews performed for Columbia University around 1958-9.

My inquiries concern his voice - did he ever express disappointment at being dubbed in State Fair? I believe that he pointed out the irony of having been a vocalist in the Columbia University papers, but didn't as I recall indicate that he was upset about his talent being ignored.

How about the behind-the-scenes story on why his second character in The Forbidden Street was dubbed by another actor? I'm certain that he could have pulled off an accent and it's a bit disconcerting to see him but hear another person speaking. I'm sure that this had to be so back in 1949 which was two years before I came into the world. I've yet to uncover who provided the voice instead, but in my case anyway, it's jarring enough to keep from from seeing the film a second time.

Anyway, thank you for being here and here's wishing you much success with the book and all the best of the holiday season. I've put it on my Amazon wish list, so hopefully someone will get the hint.
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Re: Q & A for Dana Andrews' Biographer

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moirafinnie wrote:Unlike most biographies of actors which always make their lives before success seem rather dull, I found that Dana Andrews' complex relationship with his father and his experiences as a youth to be quite moving in your book. This was especially so since the journal entries and letters your biography uses gives us a glimpse of his internal struggles. I used to think that Dana Andrews portrayed guys who had a rough time in life quite realistically. Now I can see that his acting was rooted in reality.


Carl, could you please discuss Dana Andrews' very large family, his growing up in Texas, and why he decided to become an actor as a young man during The Depression?
Moira, I thought writing about Dana's growing up in Texas was absolutely crucial to understanding the man. He was one of 13 children--all brothers except for one sister (three other girls died in infancy). His father was a Baptist preacher who decried the movies and drinking. But Dana's father was a powerful public speaker and had a good mind. Dana respected him, although, in some ways, Charles Forrest Andrews was a kind of Elmer Gantry figure. Even though Dana early on rejected his family's religion and his father's sermons against Hollywood, he imbibed a good deal of what you might call a Protestant conscience that made him uncomfortable in the glad handing world of Hollywood and the cutthroat competition for roles and stardom.

When Dana hitchiked to Hollywood in 1930 he could have no idea, of course how long the Depression would last or that he would have to pick figs, dig ditches, and drive buses--to mention just a few of the jobs he had to take. His diary shows him to be absolutely determined to become someone of importance. He was constantly driving himself, expecting more from himself. He was not conceited but he was confident. Of course he had his moments of doubt, but really he had remarkable staying power. It took nearly a decade before he got his first movie contract, and another four years before he achieved stardom.
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Re: Q & A for Dana Andrews' Biographer

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Mary-Kate wrote:Hello Mr. Rollyson,

Dana Andrews is one of my favorite actors … “favorite actor” to me, often means someone who I’ll watch even in a poor film, just to see them. The earliest roles I saw Andrews in were Zero Hour! , The Best Years of Our Lives, and Three Hours to Kill. He made a strong impression in each role (Zero Hour!, despite Airport!, I think holds up remarkably well as a serious drama.)

I’ve also found many of his radio performances, on shows like Suspense and Lux Radio Theater. Hearing him on radio makes me appreciate all the more his wonderfully rich, expressive voice and talent for conveying so much with it. I hesitate to add to your already long list of questions, but does your book give a complete list of Andrew’s radio performances, by any chance?
I deal with Dana's more important radio performances, but I do not provide a complete list. I think the best list I've seen is in James McKay's book, Dana Andrews: The Face of Noir. I think Dana had one of the greatest voices in Hollywood. His most effective use of his voice comes in Swamp Water. There is a scene with Walter Huston in which Dana drives his voice downward to a kind of gutteral cry that is quite extraordinary. It reminds me that he had the voice of a trained opera singer. By the way, one of Dana's films, No Minor Vices, which he considered a failure, has a radio version that is extraordinary. The audience loved the performances and somehow No Minor Voices, to me, seems to work better on radio than on film.

In Zero Hour, Dana gives a memorable, taut performance. He had something to prove. He had given Paramount trouble on Elephant Walk. He had been drinking (depressed over the sudden death of his beloved brother Charles). Dana had to work very hard to convince Paramount that he could do Zero Hour, and Dana was as good as his word.
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Re: Q & A for Dana Andrews' Biographer

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MissGoddess wrote:Welcome to the Oasis and thank you for spending a little time telling us about your enigmatic subject. Count me as an admirer, Laura being one of those seminal classic films that ushered me into my lifelong love of movies. It never pales, and I believe Dana was the quintessential movie detective. Where The Sidewalk Ends is probably my second-favorite performance. Like Fallen Angel, it is complex but redemptive. And I agree with the others who admire his remarkable speaking voice. He may never have sung much in film, but I think he made more of an impact as an actor with his unique voice than a hundred others who sang their hearts out.
DANA WAS WORRIED THAT IF HE BECAME KNOWN AS A SINGER, HE WOULD NOT GET THE GREAT DRAMATIC ROLES HE CRAVED. EVEN WHEN HE COULD HAVE SUNG IN STATE FAIR HE ALLOWED THE STUDIO TO DUB HIM.
Did Dana have any preference about working in film vs. stage? Many performers then and even now, felt more serious about theater work and often played down their movie work. Do you think Dana would be surprised by all the interest and critical attention his movies receive today?
DANA LOVED THE STAGE BUT HIS GOAL WAS TO BECOME A MOVIE ACTOR. WHEN HE COULD NOT GET GOOD ROLES IN FILM, HE RETURNED TO THE STAGE. HE ENJOYED THE LIVE CONTACT WITH AUDIENCES. DANA MIGHT HAVE BEEN SURPRISED AT ALL THE ATTENTION HE IS RECEIVING--BUT THEN AGAIN IT SEEMS TO ME HE WAS BUILDING WORK TO LAST.
My favorite director is John Ford, but Tobacco Road is not a favorite film and Dana's part is very small, though he's just about the most genial character in the film. I wonder if there was anything of interest that happened during his one experience working with Ford?
FORD PREDICTED DANA WOULD BE A STAR, AND DANA BELIEVED FORD. THEN NOTHING MUCH HAPPENED. DANA CONTINUED TO WORK, BUT IT WOULD BE ANOTHER THREE YEARS BEFORE HE ACHIEVED HIS GREAT SUCCESS.
Finally, Linda Crystal happens to be a great favorite of mine. You really piqued my interest when you said she was the exception in his life, personally. Have you spoken with Miss Crystal, did she share any of her memories of Dana for your book?
DANA WAS QUITE INFATUATED WITH CRISTAL. UNFORTUNATELY I DID NOT GET TO INTERVIEW HER. BUT I WATCHED THE MANY MOVIES DANA TOOK OF HER, AND IT IS CLEAR THAT HE WAS SMITTEN. I HAVE JUST DISCOVERED AN ORAL HISTORY THAT CRISTAL RECORDED SOME YEARS AGO. WHEN I GO TO HOLLYWOOD IN FEBRUARY, I'M GOING TO SEE WHAT SHE SAYS.
P.S. Okay, one more. I understand that Dana didn't make many friendships within Hollywood circles, however I have read he and another favorite of mine, Robert Ryan, were friends. Can you elaborate a little on what interests or points of view they shared that drew them together? I believe Ryan was also not into Hollywood socializing and both men remind me of one another in their complexity as actors. Did they ever work together in a film? I'm drawing a blank on that at that moment. Thank you again for being here.
IT IS A PITY THAT DANA AND RYAN NEVER WORKED TOGETHER IN A FILM. THEY WEREN'T CLOSE FRIENDS, BUT RYAN'S DAUGHTER AND SUSAN ANDREWS HAVE DONE A VERY INTERESTING INTERVIEW TOGETHER ABOUT THEIR FATHERS. THE INTERVIEW IS AVAILABLE ONLINE.
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Re: Q & A for Dana Andrews' Biographer

Post by moira finnie »

Carl_Rollyson wrote:
MissGoddess wrote:P.S. Okay, one more. I understand that Dana didn't make many friendships within Hollywood circles, however I have read he and another favorite of mine, Robert Ryan, were friends. Can you elaborate a little on what interests or points of view they shared that drew them together? I believe Ryan was also not into Hollywood socializing and both men remind me of one another in their complexity as actors. Did they ever work together in a film? I'm drawing a blank on that at that moment. Thank you again for being here.
Carl_Rollyson wrote:IT IS A PITY THAT DANA AND RYAN NEVER WORKED TOGETHER IN A FILM. THEY WEREN'T CLOSE FRIENDS, BUT RYAN'S DAUGHTER AND SUSAN ANDREWS HAVE DONE A VERY INTERESTING INTERVIEW TOGETHER ABOUT THEIR FATHERS. THE INTERVIEW IS AVAILABLE ONLINE.
That interview with our former guest, Lisa Ryan and Dana Andrews' daughter, Susan Andrews, can be heard here:
http://www.podtech.net/home/3848/robert-ryan-and-dana-andrews-had-daughters

Lisa Ryan's delightful and insightful Q & A with the SSO can be seen here:
http://silverscreenoasis.com/oasis3/vie ... =36&t=2658
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Re: Q & A for Dana Andrews' Biographer

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Thank you very much for your reply! I hope you do get to hear Linda's recording, I'm very curious about it and hope it can somehow be made available to more people. I've no idea what these "oral histories" are...if they are the histories of the subject or something broader, but they sound fascinating.

I've listened to the Ryan/Andrews' daughters interview, that's where I learned about the friendship. I believe Mr. Ryan's daughter has participated here at the SSO from time to time. (I see Moira has posted the relevant links. Thanks, Moira!)

The movie of his I most want to see is Swamp Water. Did Dana enjoy working with Renoir?

I'd love to see his Perry Como appearance.

I respect anyone who "pays their dues" the way Dana did. His hard work in and out of his own field informs every role, makes them more believable, real men. You can't get that by just playing parts or in a class, you have to live. Thanks again for sharing some of his life with us. :D
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Re: Q & A for Dana Andrews' Biographer

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Dear Mr. Rollyson,

A wonderful welcome to you as you visit us here at the Silver Screen Oasis! We appreciate your time and consideration.

One of Dana Andrews' onscreen performances includes "A Tree. A Rock. A Cloud" by Carson McCullers, and I have never seen this short film. Can you tell us a little about it? Was it simply a reading of the short story by Andrews in 1978? It seems the theme of the short story, spiritual isolation of the human condition, might even be a metaphor for Andrews' body of work in some of his more recognizable roles. What drew him to this project in the first place?

Also, I was lucky enough to be acquainted with Helen West in the 1970s-1980s, who was my father's secretary at a multimillion dollar petroleum transportation complex in the Houston area, and was a polite, lovely lady, who might be characterized as a "Steel Magnolia." She fondly recalled her connection to Dana Andrews, a cousin, but said that "he didn't go by the name Dana." Can you elaborate a bit on his years in Texas, and his experiences at Sam Houston State University, other than what you have said about his Protestant reticence at dealing with the Hollywood elite?
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Re: Q & A for Dana Andrews' Biographer

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Carl_Rollyson wrote:I deal with Dana's more important radio performances, but I do not provide a complete list. I think the best list I've seen is in James McKay's book, Dana Andrews: The Face of Noir.


Thank you kindly for giving me that information (I’m reminded of A Miracle of 34th Street. :) )
Carl_Rollyson wrote:I think Dana had one of the greatest voices in Hollywood. His most effective use of his voice comes in Swamp Water. There is a scene with Walter Huston in which Dana drives his voice downward to a kind of gutteral cry that is quite extraordinary. It reminds me that he had the voice of a trained opera singer.


It's so rich and mellifluous, and I think I can detect traces of his natural accent from time to time. I found it amusing when I heard someone criticize Andrews’s “phony” Southern accent in Swamp Water, not knowing his antecedents. True, there’s great variety in regional dialects from state to state, but it sounded much more authentic than many other so called “Southern” accents I’ve heard.

Would that be during their unfortunate confrontation after Ben comes back from the swamp? Perhaps my favorite part is the reconciliation scene, after Thursday has saved his son from the mob…
Thursday: You’re sick Ben
Ben: Not so sick that I have to lay here and listen to you give me down the country, I knowed that was all you drug me out of that crick for
Thursday: I drug you out because you was my boy
Myself: blinks hard

Thank you for the additional information about Zero Hour! (and of course, I should have said Airplane, not Airport, can’t understand why I mixed up the titles.)

I’ve heard the radio version of No Minor Vices several years ago, got the film some time after, and I couldn’t agree more! The radio version is laugh out loud funny, but the film itself isn’t, oddly enough. (Here is the link to the radio play, in case any SSO members haven’t heard it yet:
http://archive.org/download/ScreenDirec ... _Vices.mp3)

Again, Mr. Rollyson, thank you for your time and for sharing your extensive knowledge with us.
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Re: Thank you for being here

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clore wrote:I've been a fan of Dana Andrews since the year 1965 where I saw him in six theatrical releases and discovered LAURA and BOOMERANG! on TV. I had seen him in other films earlier, but at that point I was a bit too young to be paying attention to anyone who wasn't SKY KING. Somewhere around here, I have some saved documents, printed from an oral history that Mr. Andrews performed for Columbia University around 1958-9.

My inquiries concern his voice - did he ever express disappointment at being dubbed in State Fair? I believe that he pointed out the irony of having been a vocalist in the Columbia University papers, but didn't as I recall indicate that he was upset about his talent being ignored.

How about the behind-the-scenes story on why his second character in The Forbidden Street was dubbed by another actor? I'm certain that he could have pulled off an accent and it's a bit disconcerting to see him but hear another person speaking. I'm sure that this had to be so back in 1949 which was two years before I came into the world. I've yet to uncover who provided the voice instead, but in my case anyway, it's jarring enough to keep from from seeing the film a second time.

Anyway, thank you for being here and here's wishing you much success with the book and all the best of the holiday season. I've put it on my Amazon wish list, so hopefully someone will get the hint.
DANA DIDN'T MIND BEING DUBBED IN STATE FAIR. HIS CHARACTER ONLY SINGS A FEW LINES AND DANA WAS HAPPY FOR ANOTHER ACTOR TO GET SOME WORK DUBBING. HE WAS UPSET ABOUT FORBIDDEN STREET (BRITISH TITLE: BRITTANIA MEWS). HE CAME TO ENGLAND WITH A BRITISH ACCENT PREPARED AND DIDN'T EVEN KNOW HIS VOICE WAS DUBBED UNTIL AFTER THE FILM WAS SHOT. HE WAS VERY ANGRY. IT SHOULD NOT HAVE HAPPENED. I FEEL QUITE CONFIDENT HE COULD HAVE DONE BOTH VOICES, AND HOW MUCH MORE INTERESTING TO HEAR DANA ANDREWS WITH A BRITISH ACCENT. MAUREEN O'HARA, HIS CO-STAR, DID NOT LIKE THE FILM, BUT SHE WAS FULL OF PRAISE FOR DANA'S PERFORMANCE.
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Re: Q & A for Dana Andrews' Biographer

Post by Carl_Rollyson »

Mary-Kate wrote:
Carl_Rollyson wrote:I deal with Dana's more important radio performances, but I do not provide a complete list. I think the best list I've seen is in James McKay's book, Dana Andrews: The Face of Noir.


Thank you kindly for giving me that information (I’m reminded of A Miracle of 34th Street. :) )
Carl_Rollyson wrote:I think Dana had one of the greatest voices in Hollywood. His most effective use of his voice comes in Swamp Water. There is a scene with Walter Huston in which Dana drives his voice downward to a kind of gutteral cry that is quite extraordinary. It reminds me that he had the voice of a trained opera singer.


It's so rich and mellifluous, and I think I can detect traces of his natural accent from time to time. I found it amusing when I heard someone criticize Andrews’s “phony” Southern accent in Swamp Water, not knowing his antecedents. True, there’s a great variety in regional dialects from state to state, but it sounded much more authentic than many other so called “Southern” accents I’ve heard.

WHEN DANA WOULD VISIT TEXAS, HE WOULD SOMETIMES SLIP INTO THE ACCENT HE HAD USED AS A BOY.

Would that be during their unfortunate confrontation after Ben comes back from the swamp? Perhaps my favorite part is the reconciliation scene, after Thursday has saved his son from the mob…
Thursday: You’re sick Ben
Ben: Not so sick that I have to lay here and listen to you give me down the country, I knowed that was all you drug me out of that crick for
Thursday: I drug you out because you was my boy
Myself: blinks hard

YES, YOU'VE IDENTIFIED THE SCENE I WAS THINKING OF.

Thank you for the additional information about Zero Hour! (and of course, I should have said Airplane, not Airport, can’t understand why I mixed up the titles.)

I’ve heard the radio version of No Minor Vices several years ago, got the film some time after, and I couldn’t agree more! The radio version is laugh out loud funny, but the film itself isn’t, oddly enough. (Here is the link to the radio play, in case any SSO members haven’t heard it yet:
http://archive.org/download/ScreenDirec ... _Vices.mp3)
THANKS FOR PROVIDING THE LINK.

Again, Mr. Rollyson, thank you for your time and for sharing your extensive knowledge with us.
IT IS MY PLEASURE TO BE ABLE TO SPEAK WITH SO MANY PEOPLE INTERESTED IN DANA ANDREWS.
[b][url]http://www.carlrollyson.com/[/url][/b]
[url=http://www.carlrollyson.com/_i__hollywood_enigma__dana_andrews__i__115928.htm][b]Author of Hollywood Enigma: Dana Andrews (Univ. Press of Mississippi)[/b][/url]
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