ZOO IN BUDAPEST (1933)

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feaito

Post by feaito »

MissGoddess wrote:Fernando---I love movies like that, too. Have you seen The Enchanted Cottage? I bet you have, it's right up there with those other titles in this type of film. Some of Val Lewton's films also possess ethereal qualities.
I taped it off of TCM once and I thought it was fantastic. I have heard that the silent version with May McAvoy and Dick Barthelmess is even superior. Could it be?
About Loretta---I wonder if her growing attachment to Catholicism ought not to be mentioned when considering her career. It didn't prevent her from straying from the path in her youth but she certainly seemed to immerse herself into it more and more over the years (hence her legendary "swear box", which would appear on each film set and anyone who swore or cursed had to pay a "fine"). It must have influenced her choices of roles.
You might have a point there April. BTW there are so many anecdotes related to that "swear box".
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Post by MissGoddess »

I've heard next to nothing about the earlier version of The Enchanted Cottage, but I can easily picture it lending itself perfectly to the silent medium. However, Herbert Marshall is one of the reasons I like it so much, and I have to say his beautiful voice (and "voice of wisdom") contributes a lot to the result.
feaito

Post by feaito »

MissGoddess wrote:However, Herbert Marshall is one of the reasons I like it so much, and I have to say his beautiful voice (and "voice of wisdom") contributes a lot to the result.
He was indeed a very gifted actor April.
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Post by moira finnie »

About Loretta---I wonder if her growing attachment to Catholicism ought not to be mentioned when considering her career.~Miss Goddess
Of course, this had an effect on her acting and occasionally I suspect that it led to her to create some rather inhibited portrayals, but her inner conflicts may have enhanced some parts. I sometimes think that her ability to play characters who were conflicted by their emotional & ethical choices was heightened by her religious faith. This seems evident to me in less overtly "holy" movies of the '40s and early '50s such as And Now Tomorrow, Cause for Alarm, The Stranger and some other films. In these roles her characters seem a bit more complex than the elegant clothes horse types she'd been relegated to playing during that middle period of her film career.

Having grown up seeing the films in which she played close to her own ideals, such as The Farmer's Daughter, The Bishop's Wife, and Come to the Stable, I'm also quite fond of these films, though her early movies may be her best, dramatically. Of course, the spiritual conflict that she felt playing parts in the changing censorship atmosphere in movies may have been one of the reasons why she left movies for good in the early '50s.
I have heard that the silent version with May McAvoy and Dick Barthelmess is even superior. Could it be? ~feaito
Fernando, I was completely unaware that there was a silent version of The Enchanted Cottage. From what I've been able to find in a quick search, it was made in 1924. IMDb only has one person in Wales commenting on it. I wonder where and if a print of this exists? Wouldn't it be an interesting double bill to see both versions?
MissGoddess wrote:
However, Herbert Marshall is one of the reasons I like it so much, and I have to say his beautiful voice (and "voice of wisdom") contributes a lot to the result.
He was indeed a very gifted actor April.~feaito
Wow, two other people who appreciate the mellifluous Herbert Marshall! I heard a record once of him reading various poems from Shakespeare to W.H. Auden, and never forgot it, or him. Also think he's the bee's knees whenever he plays a worldly-wise fellow such as Somerset Maugham in The Moon & Sixpence and The Razor's Edge. I also love it when he plays a morally sketchy type as he does so effectively in High Wall and delightfully in the earlier Trouble in Paradise. Even though I know he's the bad guy, Mr. Marshall, not to mince words, put the "oo" in smooth, LOL... :wink:

What do you think our chances are of getting TCM to put together a Herbert Marshall Star of the Month sometime?. What's that you say? Something about a snowball in hell?
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Herbert Marshall

Post by knitwit45 »

I'll sign the petition....more than once!!!! :lol: If c-scope can fly under TCM's radar by using multiple names (maybe it's someone with multiple personalities...like SCHIZO) then why can't I???

The first time I saw Herbert Marshall was in The Enchanted Cottage when I was quite young, and I thought he really was blind. Since this is a top of the favorites list for me, I'm really happy to read others' take on the man and the movie.

pass that petition!!!!

Nancy
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Post by MissGoddess »

I'd love to see Herbie as Star of the Month!!!! He's a unique figure in the parade of Hollywood leading men---mature, polished, erudite, dry, unspectacular looking with a gift-from-heaven voice and a wooden leg that didn't stop him from having a torrid affair with Gloria Swanson. Love that man!

I want to also mention his role in Lubitsch's Angel, a film and a performance that is too often overlooked.
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Post by MissGoddess »

WOOO Hooooo!!!! Thanks to Moira piqueing my curiosity about MOON AND SIXPENCE, I did a quick check on it on Imbd and found out it's recently been released to dvd!!!!!!!! I seldom buy something sight unseen, but this time Herbert Marshall AND George Sanders in a Somerset Maugham story override any potential qualms.

I can't wait to see this, finally.
feaito

Post by feaito »

MissGoddess wrote:I want to also mention his role in Lubitsch's Angel, a film and a performance that is too often overlooked.
I couldn't agree more with you regarding "Angel" April. I saw it many years ago and I liked it very much. I think it has been unfairly underrated.
feaito

Post by feaito »

MissGoddess wrote:WOOO Hooooo!!!! Thanks to Moira piqueing my curiosity about MOON AND SIXPENCE, I did a quick check on it on Imbd and found out it's recently been released to dvd!!!!!!!! I seldom buy something sight unseen, but this time Herbert Marshall AND George Sanders in a Somerset Maugham story override any potential qualms.

I can't wait to see this, finally.
It's been on my wish list for a while now. We have very similar tastes April!
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Post by MissGoddess »

Isn't it exciting that's it's available now, Fernando? It gives me hope for more titles in the future coming to dvd.
feaito

Post by feaito »

Fernando, I was completely unaware that there was a silent version of The Enchanted Cottage. From what I've been able to find in a quick search, it was made in 1924. IMDb only has one person in Wales commenting on it. I wonder where and if a print of this exists? Wouldn't it be an interesting double bill to see both versions?
I don't think it is a Lost film, Moira. And yes indeed, it would be a magnificent double feature. The Silent version was released by First National who later merged with Warner Bros. And RKO released the 1945 film version. TCM owns the rights to most of Warner Bros. films and RKO movies too. Does this mean that TCM owns the rights of the Silent version too? Or maybe it is in the Public Domain now.

Wow, two other people who appreciate the mellifluous Herbert Marshall! I heard a record once of him reading various poems from Shakespeare to W.H. Auden, and never forgot it, or him. Also think he's the bee's knees whenever he plays a worldly-wise fellow such as Somerset Maugham in The Moon & Sixpence and The Razor's Edge. I also love it when he plays a morally sketchy type as he does so effectively in High Wall and delightfully in the earlier Trouble in Paradise. Even though I know he's the bad guy, Mr. Marshall, not to mince words, put the "oo" in smooth, LOL... :wink:

What do you think our chances are of getting TCM to put together a Herbert Marshall Star of the Month sometime?. What's that you say? Something about a snowball in hell?
I think Mr. Marshall deserves a tribute. And his role as gaston in "Trouble in Paradise" is one of his best. It's great to see him as a sophisticated man of the world, a rather untypical role for him. I'd also like seeing him playing the lover in the 1929 version of "The Letter" opposite Jeanne Eagels, which was supposedly to be released together with Davis' 1940 version as a double feature. Other good film from his early period are "Murder", "Four Frightened People" (a small gem) and "Blonde Venus".
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Post by moira finnie »

Fernando, my friend,
I've been on a hunt for a copy of the Jeanne Eagel's 1929 The Letter for some time, though prints do apparently exist, since the movie is screened occasionally at places such as MoMA or film festivals. Come to think of it, I'd like to see Kim Novak's turn as Jeanne Eagels as well, (another mysteriously m.i.a. movie, albeit from the '50s?).

Of the other films that you've mentioned, I've seen and enjoyed a few:

Murder: terrible soundtrack but interesting proto-Hitchcock and love the amateur detective/gentleman-actor role for Marshall.

Blonde Venus: Bert's first scene with Marlene in the water is fine and frisky. Guess the radium poisoning caused him to become a moralistic prig later in the film, eh? Love the gorilla suit, though.

Four Frightened People: Saw it when I was a little kid. Thought Marshall was very cool, even then. Must check it out again soon.

Angel: Only read about it. Sounds great. Herbert Marshall, Marlene Dietrich and Edward Everett Horton all in one movie, being directed by Lubitsch? Gotta find this one soon.

Thanks for mentioning them.
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Post by Sue Sue Applegate »

This thread is so interesting. Thank you Moira and Fernando and Miss Goddess. I've often wondered about Young's early precode period, and after reading your well-thought out theory, Moira, I hope to see Zoo in Budapest or The Enchanted Cottage. All your contributions on this thread (Moira, Fernando, and Miss G.) were so enlightening.

I need to make more time to find and watch these great films, but it doesn't sound hopeful for Zoo in Budapest. You folks are very lucky that you are able to take advantage of film archives and presentations in NYC.
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Post by moira finnie »

You folks are very lucky that you are able to take advantage of film archives and presentations in NYC.~Sue Sue Applegate
Thanks, Christy, but I don't live in NYC, but in the wilds of upstate NY apple country. I saw Zoo in Budapest on Fox Movie Channel quite recently for the second time. Outside of college presentations of movies and a once in a blue moon trip to the Eastman House in Rochester, I've never been to a film festival, darn it!

They show some of the oddest combos of movies on FMC. One time it's something interesting like Zoo, the next hour it's Weekend at Bernie's II. As long as I get to see some good stuff, I'll probably keep it as part of my cable package. If you have this channel, you might want to keep your eye out for this one. Btw, good, old movies on FMC tend to be aired between 5am and noon here in the east. The rest is pretty schlocky, or, should I say, not geared to my demographic interest.
Christy wrote: I hope to see Zoo in Budapest or The Enchanted Cottage
I believe that the 1945 version of The Enchanted Cottage is available on vhs and is scheduled to be on TCM next on Oct 10th, at 1:15PM ET and again on Nov. 2nd at 12:45AM ET. Perhaps you can catch it then if you've not seen it. I think it'll be a long wait before we see the 1924 version, if ever.
feaito

Post by feaito »

Sue Sue Applegate wrote:This thread is so interesting. Thank you Moira and Fernando and Miss Goddess. I've often wondered about Young's early precode period, and after reading your well-thought out theory, Moira, I hope to see Zoo in Budapest or The Enchanted Cottage. All your contributions on this thread (Moira, Fernando, and Miss G.) were so enlightening.

I need to make more time to find and watch these great films, but it doesn't sound hopeful for Zoo in Budapest. You folks are very lucky that you are able to take advantage of film archives and presentations in NYC.
Thanks Sue Sue, and from what Moira says maybe you'll be able to watch both movies soon :D
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