ZOO IN BUDAPEST (1933)

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Sue Sue Applegate
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Post by Sue Sue Applegate »

I'll keep my eye on the Fox Movie Channel. I have Fox, but don't check the guide as often as I do for TCM.

I really enjoyed Loretta Young in The Call of the Wild, but I have not seen any of her precodes.

I do enjoy The Farmer's Daughter and The Bishop's Wife a great deal, though.
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MissGoddess
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Post by MissGoddess »

>>>They show some of the oddest combos of movies on FMC. One time it's something interesting like Zoo, the next hour it's Weekend at Bernie's II. <<<

Oh my word! Is that ever true--and they have gotten worse over the last couple of years. 5:00 a.m. until noon is about right, if you want to catch anything decent. It's not just that they play newer movies after that, but really, really bad newer movies. Weekend at Bernie's II is a classic in comparison to most of their usual fare.

Remember when they had that marvelous resurrection of their anthology series, hosted by Robert Wagner? He would introduce all these one hour remakes of Fox movies like Laura, giving many up and coming stars their earliest TV appearances (like Steve McQueen). I was kind of hoping they might have put those newly presented episodes onto dvd, including Wagner's comments.

By the way, he was so good at it that I wish TCM would snap him up for Robert Osbourne's next "Essentials" co-host.

And back to Herbie, but related to FMC, they play the original 1950s sci-fi classic, The Fly, quite often this time of year and it has this lovely actor in a part that always makes me sad to see. It just seems somehow degrading to see someone like him in those movies (this being one of the better ones).

Sorry to digress. Sue-Sue---FMC does show Zoo in Budapest occasionally so keep an eye on their schedule.
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moira finnie
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Post by moira finnie »

Remember when [FMC] had that marvelous resurrection of their anthology series, hosted by Robert Wagner?~Miss G.
Yes, I do recall it. The best one, I thought, was the episode dramatizing The Late Christopher Bean with one of my faves, Thelma Ritter.

Yes, I also recall poor Herbert Marshall's appearance in The Fly. A depressing sight, but actors have to eat too.

Re: their other fare on FMC
Since FMC is owned by Newscorp (Rupert Murdoch), we know they have no sense of taste, so the vulgarians (and schlock) will reign free.
Thank goodness they've figured out that there is gold to be mined from many of their best '40s & '50s films on dvd, though I'm still waiting for several to show up, especially Cry of the City with Richard Conte. I guess it's just us suckers who cough up for cable that they don't care about, though I was happy to see Nightmare Alley finally revived on air.
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ken123
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Post by ken123 »

Moira,
Not a fan of Rurpert Murdoch. Please be careful ! I hear the taser police are looking for another uppity American who they can cure of their ailments. Anyone who still thinks this country is still a democratic republic, must be introduced to O'Brien. O' Connor was the name used in the film version of 1984 . Irish baddies, I can't believe that such a thing is possible.
nightwalker
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Post by nightwalker »

Just caught up with ZOO IN BUDAPEST this evening, having taped it some years ago off a local PBS station. From the descriptions I've read here about print quality, it seems to be the same version everyone else has seen.

I agree the film has an ethereal, otherworldly quality to it that one doesn't often see in film. And yes, Miss Young has a youthful freshness about her here.

I found it interesting that the 3 main characters find the most freedom in a place of confinement. A touch of irony, perhaps? In any case, an enjoyable film.

I also dug up my copy of MAN'S CASTLE, also taped years ago I think off Cinemax, and should get to it soon.

Hanging around these boards is certainly getting me to watch movies that have sat unwatched for ages! My thanks.
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Jezebel38
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They call it Sin

Post by Jezebel38 »

One other film that I've never seen from her pre-code period is They Call It Sin (1932). Has anyone else seen this one?[/quote]

Moira - Someone just posted the December TCM schedule over at their boards, and this LY movie is scheduled for Dec. 10th.
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moira finnie
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Post by moira finnie »

Hey, thanks Jezebel.
That Dec. 10th broadcast sounds cool. Now I don't have to buy another vhs that I probably won't be able to play soon as technology moves on without me--again! :wink:

Jezebel, have you seen any of the films mentioned in this thread or would you like to share your opinion of any of the actors mentioned?
Glad to see ya around,
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Jezebel38
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Post by Jezebel38 »

Re: The Letter 1929 When this was dropped from the DVD release of the 1940 Bette Davis version, someone on the TCM board gave a link to a provider of obscure (mostly bootleg) films. I think it was ForgottenFilms. I ordered this along with a bootleg of Story of Temple Drake. Being a dupe, the film is quite washed out, but watchable, and is interesting to see Herbert Marshall as the lover, but of course since he gets knocked-off, has little screen time. Now, I was not initially impressed with Jeanne Eagles, kind of reminded me a bit of Tallulah Bankhead in her vocal delivery. But the payoff comes at the very last scene in the film, and she is a tour de force in the revelation of the fact that "with all her heart, still loves the man I killed."

I noticed on the December TCM schedule that they have the 1950's biopic of Jeanne Eagles with Kim Knovac listed. I havn't seen this in decades.
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Post by moira finnie »

Last I checked, Forgotten Films is gone, but you're the first person I've ever encountered who's actually seen The Letter (1929), washed out or not. Thanks for describing it & for the heads up about Jeanne Eagels with Kim Novak and Jeff (he-can't-act-but-boy-is-he-cute) Chandler in December.

How was the legendary pre-code adaptation of Faulkner's story, The Story of Temple Drake? How is Miriam Hopkins' performance?
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Jezebel38
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Story of Temple Drake

Post by Jezebel38 »

Having read about STD in books about the precode era, I was eager to have a chance to see it, and had heard it was making the rounds at major cities. They scheduled it at The Stanford Theatre a few years ago, and I'm glad I got to see it on a big screen. The print was excellent, and the film exceeded my expectations - the cinematography, direction, as well as the performances. Miriam Hopkins is superb in this - cannot imagine any other actress of the time more suited to this role. And Jack La Rue - I got totally hooked on him after seeing this film. I was so impressed, I stayed around to watch the second showing - it was on a double bill with Three on a Match. Funny incident; during STD Jack La Rue constantly has a cigarette dangling from his mouth, and only takes it out right before he is going to have his way with Miriam. So, towards the end of 3OAM, three thugs show up at Ann Dvorak's hotel room, each entering with a close-up, first Humphrey Bogart, then Alan Jenkins, then our friend Jack La Rue, grining with a huge stogie in his mouth! The entire theatre busted out laughing!
nightwalker
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Post by nightwalker »

Just watched MAN'S CASTLE from 1933 and found it to be very enjoyable, with both stars (Tracy & Young) at their most appealing.

I was right earlier: I did tape it off Cinemax several years ago.

It's true that Tracy's character apparently is supposed to be ultra-macho and it may be, as Moira says, that this is at least in part due to the nature of relationships between men at loose ends and women during the depression, and do admit that Miss Young puts up with a lot from Tracy, especially his "insults", etc.

But I also kept watching Tracy's facial expressions as he would say these things, and I have to say that looking at his face, especially his eyes, as he said them, you just know that he loves Young and I think is somewhat taken by surprise by how he feels towards her. He's had friends, sure, but I think Tracy manages to convey that this whole loving someone thing is new to him and, although at times he's not quite sure what to make of it, he by and large is enjoying it. I think that, despite her character's youth and relative inexperience, Young is aware of this and that's why she stays with Tracy: she knows that he loves her and also knows that this is how he expresses it.

The pre-code aspects of the script are really quite negligible and, with a few tweaks, the film could have been made after 1934. Then again, there is that nude moonlight swim in the river near the film's beginning!

Also, in the opening scene in the park, just before the characters meet, as Tracy is sitting on a park bench dressed in a tuxedo feeding pigeons,
I couldn't help but think how much, as the shadows play across his face, he looked like Mr. Hyde! That probably says more about me than the film, however.

In any case, if you can get hold of a copy, it's well worth a look (and yes, I am willing to trade if anyone's interested).
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Post by metsfan »

I remember recording this charming film early last year and enjoying every bit of it. It had moments of humor, drama, action and nice imagery. It also gave me an insight on the sad way animals were kept on bare concrete floors and small cages but then again they didn't have sufficient info back then. I'm glad many of you have seen it.
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Ann Harding
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Post by Ann Harding »

I love Loretta Young's precodes as well. Especially Zoo in Budapest and Man's Castle.
I saw Man's Castle for the first time in 1986 in a cinema in Paris. The print was darkish, but, I immediately love it. Luckily, I managed to tape the film on British TV some years later.
But, if you read Hervé Dumont's book on Borzage, you'll discover that the film received numerous cuts: parts of the dialogue and some scenes. The copies I saw were censored. I have no idea if the film has survived in an uncut version. I suspect the cuts were made when the film was re-released after the Production Code.

If you have seen the film on a big screen recently, do you know if it was uncensored version?

If you've never seen it, I posted on my blog a full scene with dialogue:
http://annhardingstreasures.blogspot.co ... -1933.html
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Post by MissGoddess »

Oh my goodness, Ann! I had tears in my eyes looking at those scenes from A Man's Castle! I want to see this movie SO BAD!!!! How wonderful that you got to see it on the big screen! Merveilleux!

Thank you very much for sharing this. :D
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