Desert Island Discs

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David
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Desert Island Discs

Post by David »

Dear Member

I know this is a film site but on another similar site I ran a feature called Desert Island Discs which should have been more popular and perhaps will be here. It is based on a long running BBC radio series in which a famous guest is cast away on a desert island with only eight records, a book (apart from the bible and Shakespeare), a luxury item and two films, something I've introduced myself as this is a film site.

Members are cordially invited to pick and list their eight favourite records, book, luxury item (with which they cannot escape) and two favourite films. In listing these items to make it more interesting members are invited to provide reasons for their choices which could be because they remind them of pleasant occasions, notable incidents or whatever.

I am kicking things off with my first two favourites at this stage. Others will follow in due course

As I believe or delude myself that I am not a prisoner to any musical genre or era, I have selected a record from each of the decades spanning the 1920s to the 1990s although I slightly favour the 1920s and 1930s.

1920s

This was tough but then it's tough for any decade. In the end it boiled down to Fascinating Rhythm by the Savoy Orpheans 1926 or Varsity Drag by George Olsen 1927. In the end I chose Varsity Drag because I think it perfectly illustrates the madness and freedom of the 1920s and the plethora of crazy dances.

1930s

Another tough one but in the end I came down to We're in the Money by Ginger Rogers 1933 which I've loved since a child. This song is apparently concerned with the end of the great depression and so has some historical relevance. In the video I also love the choreography (by Buzby Berkeley) and of course the lovely girls.

I look forward to your contributions.

David
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movieman
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Post by movieman »

Hi, David!

Welcome to our group! I look forward to hearing more from you.
This is a great topic!

I hope your desert island discs includes albums.

Here's eight albums I couldn't do without:

The Shadows: "The Great Shadows" (1963?) German Columbia. This album introduced me to the british guitar instrumental group. The album came from my father's collection (what is left of it). To me it's a classic.

Jim Reeves: "Good 'N' Country" (1963) US RCA Camden. This one is a early nashville sound record which must have sounded quite modern at the time. It's one of the first country albums featuring Pete Drake's "talking steele", an invention of his. I couldn't do without Jim Reeves' beautiful voice.

Jim Reeves: "Moonlight and Roses" (1964). Reeves' renditions of standards such as Dick Haymes' "Roses", Connie Francis' "Carolina Moon", "Moon River" from 'Breakfast at Tiffany's", "There's a New Moon Over My Shoulder", "Oh What It Seemed to Be", "What's in It for Me" and others.

Elvis Presley: "Golden Records". I've been an Elvis fan since about 1986 (I was 6 or 7 years old. Elvis was one of the first singers who introduced me to great music. I've listened to the album many times over the years both on cassette and vinyl LP. All the songs are winners.

Connie Smith and Nat Stuckey "Young Love" (1969). My favourite country duet album. Connie Smith is my favourite country songstress. To quote the liner notes on the back of the sleeve: "Connie and Nat go together like ham and eggs, salt and pepper, or other such inseparables...".

Sunny Sweeney: "Heartbreaker's Hall of Fame" (2006). This CD made me believe they can still produce good country music in the US. The album is cheerful and well produced. Great musicians! The album steers clear of the 'Nashville pop' sound of the "country" hit music. I love it!

This is enough for now, or I'll end up writing a book. :wink:

Even B
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charliechaplinfan
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Post by charliechaplinfan »

It's a good thread but I'll have to give it serious thought . I'm never very good at making favorites list. Too many to choose from :wink:
Failure is unimportant. It takes courage to make a fool of yourself - Charlie Chaplin
David
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Post by David »

Dear Movieman

Well thanks a million for your warm welcome and for your contribution. This is precisely what we want. I hope we'll be seeing the remainder of your contribution in due course.

Albums are allowed as classical music is allowed but I'm not sure if this is entirely within the rules of the game. Obviously you are a country music fan and I do like many Jim Reeves numbers including Distant Drums and He'll Have To Go. The Shadows made some marvellous records of course including their first no. 1 Apache.

One thing, are you male or female, your name and avitar seem to be in conflict. Totally irrelevant of course but intriguing.

David
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Post by David »

Dear Charliechaplinfan

Yes that's the beauty of it "decisions, decisions, decisions" but it's worth it because it's quite a good exercise.
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Post by stuart.uk »

Films
The Searchers and Red River

records

Chaplin's The Kid and Limelight
Anthony Newley-Gonna Build A Mountain
Cliff Richard-Miss You Nights
Tina Turner-River Deep Mountain High
Rosemarry Clooney-Come In From The Rain
Elvis Presley-If I Can Dream
Judy Garland-Over The Rainbow
Louis Armsrtong-It's A Wonderful World

Book-The Bible
David
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Stuart

Post by David »

Thanks a lot Stuart. I thought you'd pick Anthony Newley. I think I would go for Pop Goes The Weasel, Do You Mind or possibly What Kind of Fool Am I. There are so many to pick from.

You've forgotten your luxury and you already have the Bible and Shakespeare so another book please.

David
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ChiO
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Post by ChiO »

Records

Assuming that the intention is eight cuts (i.e. not albums), then...

The RONETTES, Be My Baby - My favorite 45 and it has the Wall-of-Sound
The GO-BETWEENS, Bachelor Kisses - Beautiful, and it's important to hear Don't believe what you've heard/"Faithful"'s not a bad word over and over
The MEKONS, Heaven and Back - I'll probably have time to learn to dance and this is the tune to do it to
JAMES CARR, The Dark End of the Street - THE soul ballad
LOUIS ARMSTRONG & HIS HOT FIVE, West End Blues - Jazz, blues, r'n'b, soul and rock'n'roll all rolled up into one breathtaking Satchmo solo
BILLIE HOLIDAY, The Man I Love - Music & lyrics by the Gershwins, a solo by Lester Young, and THAT voice
MILES DAVIS, Blue in Green - Not sure that jazz was ever lovelier
CHARLES MINGUS, Goodbye Pork Pie Hat - A heartbreaking composition by my favorite jazz composer (with apologies to Duke and Monk)

If albums are permitted (though I've omitted "Greatest Hits", anthologies, and self-created compilations because inclusion seems like cheating), then...

Mingus Ah Um - Strong from start to finish, and it includes Goodbye Pork Pie Hat
Kind of Blue,MILES DAVIS - Maybe the perfect album, and it includes Blue in Green
A Love Supreme, JOHN COLTRANE - Will need something transcendent on the island and this is it
Pet Sounds, The BEACH BOYS - Not only does it have God Only Knows and Caroline No, it is gorgeous throughout
The Ramones - Loud, fast and dumb
Daddy's Highway, The BATS - The Byrds and R.E.M. rolled into one modern bit of jangly folk-rock
Everything Is Wrong, MOBY - Although not a big fan of techno or rave, this album moves me physically and emotionally
Velvet Underground & Nico - The film noir of albums, a reminder that maybe the world left behind isn't all that great

Book

Catch-22 - Long enough to occupy some time in reading, episodic so that it can be read multiple times in different orders, tragic, comic, thought-provoking and thoroughly enjoyable

Luxury item

Aside from the equipment necessary to play the music and watch the movies (TV with DVD player or computer) and my wife (she's my "luxury", but not an "item") and daughters, probably a high capacity refrigerator for storing whatever food is found and prepared

Movies

This was actually the easiest category for me.

CITIZEN KANE - My favorite movie and one in which I always find something new to ponder

DUCK SOUP - Not my 2nd favorite movie, or even in my Top 10, but if I'm stuck on an island, then I want the movie that always makes laugh as if it's the first time I've seen it
Everyday people...that's what's wrong with the world. -- Morgan Morgan
I love movies. But don't get me wrong. I hate Hollywood. -- Orson Welles
Movies can only go forward in spite of the motion picture industry. -- Orson Welles
jdb1

Post by jdb1 »

This is so hard - I'll list eight individual tracks, but of course there could easily be 800, as well as 800 albums:

Mr. Sandman - The Chordettes (the first song that comes to mind when I think of the 1950s, the era when I first became sentient)
Chopin Ballade No. 3 - Murray Perahia (favorite piano piece played by my favorite pianist; always makes me happy)
Daydream Believer - The Monkees (first song that comes to mind when I think of the 60s - very cheerful sound)
She'd Rather Be With Me - The Turtles (second song that comes to mind when I think of the 60s - also very upbeat)
Here Comes The Moon - George Harrison (can I cheat and have the acoustic and full versions?)
Lovesick Blues - Hank Williams (love Hank, and he yodels some in this one)
You're Gonna Lose That Girl - The Beatles (dunno - I just like it)
E Lucevan Le Stelle (from Tosca) - Pavarotti (he gets the entire human condition into one brief aria - good for the spirit)

Books
Little Women - (a very important part of my girlhood; a lovely story; and an affirmation of Girl Power)

Movies
A virtually impossible choice; but -- I'll go with the two that I would immediately list as my favorites under any circumstances:
Desk Set - because I love Tracy and Hepburn, and I love this witty and generally overlooked opus of theirs the best.
The Incredible Shrinking Man - because looking at Grant Williams in his abbreviated tatters as he shrinks is always a treat, and because of the ultimately uplifting message of the film.

Luxury Item
Short-wave radio with solar panels - is that considered a luxury or a necessity? Otherwise - a lifetime supply of Goldenberg's Peanut Chews.
David
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Discs

Post by David »

My goodness thank you all so very much. I'm totally overwhelmed and delighted with your responses so far. Such a contrast to the other site where I tried this segment, I had to beg people to contribute. I think that in fairness the records should be limited to a single or say a passage from a famous piece. I'm sorry I didn't make that clear in the original rules.

I must study your contributions and comment but in fact I have a mea culpa as I have only made a part contribution myself so far.
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MissGoddess
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Post by MissGoddess »

Songs/Album Cuts:

"The Lady is a Tramp" - Sinatra and Basie at the Sands
"The Best is Yet to Come" - ditto
"Violets for Your Furs" - Sinatra Live in Seattle - '57
"The Shadow of Your Smile" - The Sandpiper - Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
"The Tamarind Seed" Theme - Original Motion Picture Soundtrack by John Barry
"Baubles, Bangles and Beads" - Francis Albert Sinatra/Antonio Carlos Jobim
"What Makes a Man to Wander?" - Sons of the Pioneers/Stan Jones
"Tiny Dancer" - Elton John


Movies:

Gone with the Wind
The Thin Man


Books:

Jane Eyre
Emma


Luxury Item:

Can I have Gary Cooper?
David
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Post by David »

On we go to the 1940s and 50s then.

1940s

I'm afraid I'm going to cheat here. This song was written in the 1940s but in fact the version I have chosen was released in 1953. It's How High The Moon by Les Paul and Mary Ford. I loved this record when I first heard it as a seven year old. I think it stayed top of the US charts for ten weeks which is still probably a record. Les Paul was a genius in my opinion, he invented multi-tracking and also with Gibson the first solid guitar which is a staple item of every pop group these days. I think this record has twelve tracks of Les Paul and twelve tracks of Mary Ford.

1950s

I suppose it could be argued that I'm cheating here as well because apparently this song was written in 1931 though I've never heard a 1930s version of it. I've chosen the mega hit version of 1957-Love Letters In the Sand by Pat Boone. This is a great arrangement and reminds me of summer holidays in Hampshire with my auntie when I fell in love with a local girl Rosemary. I love the whistling on this record since I fancy myself as something of a fair whistler.

More to follow.
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ChiO
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Post by ChiO »

David said --
It's How High The Moon by Les Paul and Mary Ford. .... I think it stayed top of the US charts for ten weeks which is still probably a record.


Not certain how long the great How High the Moon was at #1 in the U.S., but (as if it matters except to we Pop obsessives) my reference book, which covers 1955-1993, has two 45s at #1 for more than 10 weeks:

Don't Be Cruel / Hound Dog (1956) by somebody named Elvis Presley for 11 weeks 8)

I Will Always Love You (1992) by Whitney Houston for 14 weeks :roll:

Is that progress?
Everyday people...that's what's wrong with the world. -- Morgan Morgan
I love movies. But don't get me wrong. I hate Hollywood. -- Orson Welles
Movies can only go forward in spite of the motion picture industry. -- Orson Welles
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